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Difference between stock air cleaner and aftermarket?

Discussion in 'Tech Discussion' started by thecantaloupeman, Aug 6, 2019.

  1. thecantaloupeman

    thecantaloupeman Full Access Member

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    So I was just curious, what is the difference between stock and aftermarket air cleaner assemblies? The Edelbrock ones look a little cooler, but why does the stock one have a snorkel and the aftermarkets don't? Mine also has 2 vacuum lines and an exhaust heat riser. It also has a little tube that goes to the heads on the block. What do these things all do, and why don't the aftermarket ones have them?

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  2. dvdswan

    dvdswan Full Access Member

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    Mainly they were used for warming up the vehicle. When the vehicle was cold, the air cleaner housing and choke would work together allowing a richer mixture to the engine. As temps rose, the heat riser would open the valve that vacuum lines closed on the air cleaner allowing more air into the carb. I remember being cheap and just flip the lid on the air cleaner to allow more air into the carb. IIRC the aftermarket air cleaners would give about 3-5 more HP. When you have 165 HP to start it does help.

    They would also keep down intake noise, which apparently would scare mechanically deficient people.
     
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  3. thecantaloupeman

    thecantaloupeman Full Access Member

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    So is it harder to cold start with an aftermarket air cleaner? If I wanted to replace the air cleaner, how do I get rid of that heat riser? Do I have to replace the headers or something?

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  4. DoubleDingo

    DoubleDingo Vacuum Leaks, The Root Of All Evil

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    I ran an aftermarket air cleaner for years in very cold temps and had no issues with cold starts.

    If you're getting rid of the stock one, I'll buy it off you.
     
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  5. C10MixMaster

    C10MixMaster Full Access Member

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    the stock air cleaner assembly is an emissions device. it is designed to draw warm air off the exhaust manifold in order to bring the engine to operating temp faster. A cold engine running on the choke produces a lot of emissions. aftermarket air cleaner is less restrictive has more horsepower potential and looks better to a gear head, everyone knows chrome make you car faster lol. The heat riser is on the exhaust manifold it closes the exhaust pipe on the passenger side forcing hot exhaust through a passage under the intake manifold again helping to heat the engine faster reducing emissions. As for the vacuum hoses and tube you need to post a photo.
     
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  6. 4WDKC

    4WDKC Full Access Member

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  7. Tmich396

    Tmich396 Junior Member

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    I went with one of these. 20E92FED-2117-4B1D-A630-1C4CA49EEDAA.jpeg
     
  8. thecantaloupeman

    thecantaloupeman Full Access Member

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    Thats awesome! Where did you find that?
     
  9. thecantaloupeman

    thecantaloupeman Full Access Member

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    I don't think im getting rid of it yet, I'm not sure if it would pass emissions without it. I'll have to see. But it does have a fresh coat of high heat black paint!
     
  10. 1987 GMC Jimmy

    1987 GMC Jimmy Automobile Hoarder

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    Then don’t think about getting rid of the cat, or you’ll definitely fail emissions.
     
  11. thecantaloupeman

    thecantaloupeman Full Access Member

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    Haha I was just joking. I wish I could do that.

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  12. Hatchet54

    Hatchet54 Full Access Member

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    Maybe slightly unrelated, but does anyone have any experience with one of these?
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Dave 84

    Dave 84 Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    When you live in Arizona none of this is necessary lol it was 90 degrees at 8am I'm thinking about how long I can drive my k5 till it vapor locks! Lol
     
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  14. 75gmck25

    75gmck25 Full Access Member

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    If you want your engine to breathe well, don't buy one of those goofy looking small diameter air cleaners. For best air flow you want a large diameter air cleaner with as tall an element as possible.

    The snorkel is basically an emissions device, and was effective at warming up the air for better operation of a cold engine. However, since performance engines perform better with cold air, the snorkel was then ducted up to a hole in the radiator support to provide cold air after the engine was warm. Since high performance engines needed more cold air, some got dual snorkel air cleaners, or had cowl induction hoods.

    On small performance cars its usually beneficial to have the snorkel connected to the radiator support, since underhood temps are high and you want to give the engine cooler air. However, a squarebody has such a large engine compartment that I don't think underhood temps are as high. One very simple way (already mentioned) to take the snorkel out of the equation in the summer is to flip the air cleaner lid and let the stock setup draw air all the way around the air cleaner.

    Bruce
     
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  15. Arkansas_V8

    Arkansas_V8 Proud Redneck

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    I had that issue on some days here in Arkansas.

    The snorkel, and heat wrap on fuel lines have solved both times I suffered vapor lock.

    You can see how tucked my exhaust is in some of my pics, heat wrap solved that on my TBI. Real close to lines, and filter.

    On my old Suburban with a carb, the snorkel alone was the answer. I was boiling in the carb.


    These were not daily occurrences by any means(more often TBI). But often enough to annoy.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2019

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