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Looking into a new compact car.

Discussion in 'Other Vehicles' started by jake wells, Jan 26, 2021.

  1. SquareRoot

    SquareRoot Full Access Member

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    My Nissan Frontier has been good to me for a daily commute vehicle. Today it has 319,726 miles on it. It still runs good but is on its last leg.

    I'm waiting for the new, redesigned "midsize" Frontier to be released in the next few months. In the meantime I'm looking at the GMC Canyon Denali 2 liter turbo diesel. I really want a small diesel but not another full-size truck. My self imposed deadline for the purchase is Memorial Day.
     
  2. jake wells

    jake wells Can i be me?

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    i use to have 01 frontier and the engine was a turd that 2.4 gave me more trouble than it was worth and the fuel economy was no better than my full size 96 chevy.

    I will look into the kia's since people have been saying the direct injection is problematic.
     
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  3. SquareRoot

    SquareRoot Full Access Member

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    I watched a show recently (can't remember the name) and they were showing how one brand (can't remember the name (Ford?)) have a "fix" for the GDI issue. The problem is the back of the valve gets gummed up. They installed an injector behind the valve to prevent the buildup. I believe it only operates part time.
     
  4. CorvairGeek

    CorvairGeek Full Access Member

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    That appeared early in the life of GDI, but it doesn't appear to be the complete fix either. IIRC, some are even running MPFI and GDI because of the Low Speed Detonation issue that can destroy engines with GDI.. The engine can operate in either mode or combinations, just like valve timing changes. SO COMPLEX!
     
  5. Dutch Rutter

    Dutch Rutter Full Access Member

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    I've had two wrx. An 04 and an 06 wagon. Both were amazingly fun before they were totalled. They were the wife's DDs. VERY safe cars too btw.

    Maintenance wasent needed much.. but when it was needed it was not cheap. 100k miles make sure the timing belt has been done. Clutches are easy enough to replace, I did one with just pulling the trans back and not actually removing it. They also have a problem with rings after a while. I would also not buy one that has been "built". I built my red one a little bolt ons and tune made 320hp. But most anymore around here are driven by wannabe race car people.


    Red one was slid into a tree at 60 or so.
    Black one was taken out by a drunk driver. (Don't have a picture of the aftermath)

    20160403_125428.jpg

    Snapchat-704135291203792864.jpg
     
  6. HotRodPC

    HotRodPC Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm here to tell you buddy, being a tow driver, manuals are NOT as durable and reliable as once were. All the transmission technology is in the Autos these days without a doubt hands down, not even close. Were also talking efficency. I've towed plenty of manuals, some of them have totally 100% exploded, I mean case and all. I'm a manual guy myself but I also know what's junk and when to avoid it. I don't think I'd have a manual these days unless it were a full size truck.
     
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  7. HotRodPC

    HotRodPC Administrator Staff Member

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    Oh yeah, Avoid Nissans like COVID. Nissan has a bad problem with CVT's. Especially in the smaller cars like the Juke's and Sentras. Not as common the Murano but they still have problems. In a Juke, Sentra or Versa, it's not a matter of if, it's a matter of when.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2021
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  8. HotRodPC

    HotRodPC Administrator Staff Member

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    yeah, I wouldn't want a Spark or Sonic either for that matter. They're pretty much disposable cars and I don't think the warranty is all that great compared to other manufactuers.
     
  9. HotRodPC

    HotRodPC Administrator Staff Member

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    Probably Ford and reason I suggest so is, it sounds like Fords answer to all their ECOBOOST models. For those who aren't aware, this direct injection problem and valves gumming up is common in all Turbo models. I believe it's more of a Turbo model problem than it is a direct injection problem. VW Turbo engines have the same engine problems too like in the VW CC model cars with valves getting gummed up. One of those nature of the beast issues. If you're going to have a Turbo car you can expect to need to have engine and valve train cleanings. I've heard some people even put SeaFoam in every tank of gas to help keep the cylinders and valves clean. Carbon build up is a big problem too with Turbo engines.
     
  10. Bennyt

    Bennyt Full Access Member

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    My thoughts on all the previous posts.


    I own a 2015 Spark w/ an Auto. It is totally reliable and I get about 37 - 39 mpg on my 80 mile RT commute. It has plenty of power and does fine at 90 mph but does get blown around a bit, not enough to white knuckle and scare you, but noticeable in crosswind and behind semi's. I considered the manual but it does not get any better mpg nor any faster, actually they say its slower. The downside to the auto is that it is a CVT and doesn't hold speed well. Mine isn't base as it has PW but it does not have Cruise Control and I really wish it did as I have to watch the speedo as it seems to slows down at a steady pedal. Mine has 75k on it and I would buy another one when this one dies as it is a great car. You can buy one like mine for $5k, I don't think I would spend the money on a new one.

    Nothing wrong with KIA, but parts on most imports are probably double if it does need a repair. While the Spark isn't made in the US, you are still dealing with a mostly US company.

    The Spark is simple and I like it. My 2018 Buick with 45k and fully loaded seems to always have minor problems with it that are more nuisance that problems but enough for me to trade it in this year.

    My 2019 Frontier Pro4x has 18k on it and I like it as it is also simple. It has a key and a switch. No crazy fobs, push buttons, etc. The bad is horrible MPG, worse than my old Z71 Suburban, and it looks antiquated as it hasn't changed much since '06? The new 2022 Frontier is to be released within the next two weeks and while I am interested, I'll probably pass as I know it will never be as reliable as what it replaces due to the simplicity.

    New cars are very complex and very disposable with the electronics. Every few times Apple does an update, the Buick needs the stereo reprogramed. GM only supports the software for a few years after manufacturer and the stereo controls the HVAC and more. Anything else I buy at this stage will most likely need more frequent updates than what is outgoing. While I buy new cars every year or so, I don't want to feel like I have to.

    As for electric cars; the most reliable part of my cars has been the combustion engine. The least reliable has been the electrical sensors, computers, monitors, etc. Electric cars replace the most reliable part, the engine, and add an electric motor which has historically been the least reliable. In theory, its awesome, in reality, I believe it makes it disposable like everything else made now that plugs in.

    As far as Tesla is concerned, I intend to proceed cautiously. As I understand it, only the expensive loaded models break even and/ or make money. Tesla makes quite a bit of money from selling carbon credits to the Big 3 to offset their trucks, suv's, etc. Once the Big 3 catch up with Tesla with their own products, they will have no need for them and Tesla will lose a major stream of income.

    Lastly, someone mentioned the Diesel midsize GM trucks. I like them, and friends that have them seem to like them to. The reason why I haven't bought one yet is because they run up to $50k for a small truck. And with diesel engines come diesel problems which can be expensive when repairs are needed. For the same amount of money, I can buy a nice full-size which I just might do in a few months.

    Thank you and I apologize that you had to read my thoughts which may or may not align with your own. I buy a few cars a year so my experience is based on owning probably 50-60 different cars in my lifetime not including the "project" cars that we talk about owning but never actually drive as we are "working" on them. But yes, I have a few of those too.
     
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  11. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    This is an unfounded worry that has been the talk among "gearheads" since I was sitting in my grandpa's buddys shop (a very talented mechanic) with my dad and they were talking about how on earth do they expect these new fangled electronic things like electronic ignition and fuel injection to work 10 years from now, when it "breaks" and you cant just rebuild it like a points distributor or a carburetor...
     
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  12. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    Same thing. Just had an almost 20 year old Tahoe last year and a 06 Charger up until a couple years ago and an 07 truck until recently. That stuff all worked, for the most part. Sure switches and mechanical issues here and there. The solid state stuff was, well, solid, and if it isn't you can buy a new gauge cluster or whatever. and 15 years form now the aftermarket will have work-arounds for failing touch screen info systems.
    I agree with the "simplicity" of older vehicles, but they're only "simple" because we are all over that learning curve and the next learning curve is on the horizon.
     
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  13. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    And just like years past, some ideas don't work so well and go by the wayside and some do and are then used for a good long time. Look at the new 7.3 Superduty gasser. WAY more simplistic and old school than the predecessor 6.2L.
    The turds will drop to the bottom of the pond. There's alot of "96 Chevy full size trucks" on the road still. Why? they were dependable and still are yet today and didn't include any fatal flaw type ideas.
    But how many K cars do you see around? Especially the turbos. Still see plenty of 5.0 Mustangs of he same era.
    The shit that doesn't work will end up in a junkyard sooner and the cream will continue to rise to the top. Noone want's a 6.0 or 6.4 Powerstroke, but everyone wants a 7.3 Powerstroke. Same deal.
     
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  14. 75Monza

    75Monza Full Access Member

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    Another downside of electric/hybrid stuff here in washington state is that they passed a law so electric vehicles have a yearly $150 tax on tabs and hybrids have a $75 tax/year on tabs. The hybrid tax is BS the way they worded it saying it was needed to fund all the charging stations throughout the state just like the EV tax...as far as the ones I've seen, hybrids are self charging, there is no charge port.
     
  15. Frankenchevy

    Frankenchevy Lying Dog-Faced Pony Soldier

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    Both Ford and Toyota have utilized "dual injection" which is mpfi and DI. It's possible that others have as well. Turbos and high compression engines definitely seem to experience more oil volatility. NOACK has an oil volatility index. Basically it assigns a number based on an oils resistance to being turned into vapor at higher temps and therefore being circulated through the crankcase ventilation system.

    Oil vapors have been introduced back into your intake forever, think PCV. Up until direct injection, the valves would get washed clean by the gas/air mixture. In DI, that never takes place. So the oil crud/carbon just accumulates all over the intake valves. No matter what you put in your gas tank on a DI engine, it'll never make it to the backside of the intake valve.

    A DI engine's problems are both that crud that accumulates on the back of the intake valve and the fact that the delicate injectors don't really like being in the combustion chamber. On our Honda, they had to clean the valves before 50k and they looked horrible. Then a full set of injectors before 70k. We bought the Honda thinking we were getting something reliable for my wife's commute. I honestly think her next commuter will be a Tesla Model 3. My BIL was one of the first people I know with a Model 3 and hasn't had to do a thing to it except new tires. They eat tires up pretty good due to the regenerative braking and vehicle weight...that and they are really fun to accelerate in a straight line.
     

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