Some vent window lessons learned

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Trucksareforwork

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So I finally got to my vent windows. While I’m not going to post a thread on the finished product, or even post this like I’m an expert, I thought I might post a couple tips and lessons learned.

First, there are a lot of decent videos on this and some that are not so decent. My take is that a lot of the videos skip the real hard part, which for me is getting the seal into the channel on the frame.

Here is a good video by brothers (I do not work for or promote any products).
xc_hide_links_from_guests_guests_error_hide_media

Here is another by Chris craft.
xc_hide_links_from_guests_guests_error_hide_media

My tips from working on a 2 piece seal (this is assuming you have the window assembly out of your door. I have no idea how you would redo the seals otherwise):

1. There are a few ways to go about disassembling the frames to get the channel seal right. I removed the hinge rivets from the frame to keep the hinge intact. Some disassemble the hinge itself (I think the videos above do).

You must be registered for see images attach


2. I drilled the frame rivet at the top of the window frame to provide space for the seal to go in. This picture is after I have already removed the rivet and replaced the seal. I used a small pair of vice grips to hold the frame together while I finished putting the frame seal in.

You must be registered for see images attach


3. Use lubricant and lots of it. I used quick detailer (Griots speed shine) because I had a ton of it. It makes all the difference.

4. Oddly, one side of the seal is easier to use as your “working side” when seating than the other. And I think this changes as you move along the seal. The side that has more “breaks” in the seal is the easiest to have as your working side (meaning the side you stuff in the channel while the other side is resting in it), since the continuous side is the one you want to have already resting in the channel.

5. Measure twice. Be sure you note that the hinge side of the window is on the outside of the truck. I screwed up and put the seal in backward first (yes. It was a painful mistake).

This is incorrect:
You must be registered for see images attach


This is correct (hinge gap on exterior side of door):
You must be registered for see images attach


6. When prepping, beware that the different finish areas have different exposures. The inside panel and all the metal I did with Krylon. The exterior, though, I decided to powder coat because I figure the spray bomb wouldn’t last long. I have a kiln so was able to put the whole assembly in, and the oe chrome and paint on the interiors side held up ok at 400 degrees.

I blasted my frames overall and powder coated only the outside edge. I also powder coated the window frames.

Anyhow. So far so good. For what it’s worth, because of my mistake I got pretty fast at placing the seals in the frame. I think the first one took me an hour and a half and I didn’t even put the second part of the seal in. The second one maybe 40 mins (including the second seal), and the third (repeat) maybe 25 from stripped frame to fully installed seals with the top rivet re-installed (not done with window glass yet).
 

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Camar068

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10 yrs Air Force
So I finally got to my vent windows. While I’m not going to post a thread on the finished product, or even post this like I’m an expert, I thought I might post a couple tips and lessons learned.

First, there are a lot of decent videos on this and some that are not so decent. My take is that a lot of the videos skip the real hard part, which for me is getting the seal into the channel on the frame.

Here is a good video by brothers (I do not work for or promote any products).
xc_hide_links_from_guests_guests_error_hide_media

Here is another by Chris craft.
xc_hide_links_from_guests_guests_error_hide_media

My tips from working on a 2 piece seal (this is assuming you have the window assembly out of your door. I have no idea how you would redo the seals otherwise):

1. There are a few ways to go about disassembling the frames to get the channel seal right. I removed the hinge rivets from the frame to keep the hinge intact. Some disassemble the hinge itself (I think the videos above do).

You must be registered for see images attach


2. I drilled the frame rivet at the top of the window frame to provide space for the seal to go in. This picture is after I have already removed the rivet and replaced the seal. I used a small pair of vice grips to hold the frame together while I finished putting the frame seal in.

You must be registered for see images attach


3. Use lubricant and lots of it. I used quick detailer (Griots speed shine) because I had a ton of it. It makes all the difference.

4. Oddly, one side of the seal is easier to use as your “working side” when seating than the other. And I think this changes as you move along the seal. The side that has more “breaks” in the seal is the easiest to have as your working side (meaning the side you stuff in the channel while the other side is resting in it), since the continuous side is the one you want to have already resting in the channel.

5. Measure twice. Be sure you note that the hinge side of the window is on the outside of the truck. I screwed up and put the seal in backward first (yes. It was a painful mistake).

This is incorrect:
You must be registered for see images attach


This is correct (hinge gap on exterior side of door):
You must be registered for see images attach


6. When prepping, beware that the different finish areas have different exposures. The inside panel and all the metal I did with Krylon. The exterior, though, I decided to powder coat because I figure the spray bomb wouldn’t last long. I have a kiln so was able to put the whole assembly in, and the oe chrome and paint on the interiors side held up ok at 400 degrees.

I blasted my frames overall and powder coated only the outside edge. I also powder coated the window frames.

Anyhow. So far so good. For what it’s worth, because of my mistake I got pretty fast at placing the seals in the frame. I think the first one took me an hour and a half and I didn’t even put the second part of the seal in. The second one maybe 40 mins (including the second seal), and the third (repeat) maybe 25 from stripped frame to fully installed seals with the top rivet re-installed (not done with window glass yet).
have used those sources and a few others. I've actually got vid's for that an everything for all the window seals d/l to my pc so I can put it on the big screen in the garage and pause when needed etc.
 

Trucksareforwork

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have used those sources and a few others. I've actually got vid's for that an everything for all the window seals d/l to my pc so I can put it on the big screen in the garage and pause when needed etc.
smart. Both having the vids and having a big screen in the garage.
 

shortarms

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K10 Suburban
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So I finally got to my vent windows. While I’m not going to post a thread on the finished product, or even post this like I’m an expert, I thought I might post a couple tips and lessons learned.

First, there are a lot of decent videos on this and some that are not so decent. My take is that a lot of the videos skip the real hard part, which for me is getting the seal into the channel on the frame.

Anyhow. So far so good. For what it’s worth, because of my mistake I got pretty fast at placing the seals in the frame. I think the first one took me an hour and a half and I didn’t even put the second part of the seal in. The second one maybe 40 mins (including the second seal), and the third (repeat) maybe 25 from stripped frame to fully installed seals with the top rivet re-installed (not done with window glass yet).
I just got my frames back from powder and sitting here looking at how they're going to go back together. Staring at what appears to be 1/8" on each side to shoehorn in.

You're 100% right on videos skipping the hard part. This is not the quick sunday job it appeared to be.
 

nmyron3983

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I just did my vent windows using rubber from RubberTheRightWay.com. they went in well, and it was also my experience that while installing the seal in the rounded frame, I had to start by seating the bottom edge by sliding it it, then the elbow and top runs by seating the interior more narrow part, then the wider outside by rolling it up into the tracks with lots of silicone spray and significant thumb pressure.

While taking the spring off the passenger frame, the weld for the stud split off and I ended up ordering a pair of new frames from ClassicIndustries.com. I only replaced the passenger frame so far, as I had already completed the driver door at this point. There was a bit of work going into shedding the glass out of the frame, and seal taping the glass into the new frame.

However the initial reason for rebuilding them and replacing the locking mechanism remains. They still leak from the top corners and around the back of the passenger frame.

I'm not sure how to proceed. At this point I'm leery of leaving it out in the rain for fear of flooding the floorpan. While washing it, it didn't take on massive water but there was certainly a light shower on the inside of both door cards. I really was hoping it would seal more tightly and allow me to leave the truck outside of my shop on a rainy day.
 

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