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Who's worked with lead vs bondo?

Discussion in 'Paint and Body' started by Grit dog, Jan 19, 2021.

  1. AuroraGirl

    AuroraGirl Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Use more tallow
     
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  2. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    I think you're confusing tallow with flux.
    Tallow = non stick
    Flux/tinning flux = solder sticks to the surface its supposed to.
     
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  3. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    Will give it a shot. Plumber Buddy just picked up some tinning flux and sticks of 50/50 from his other tin knocker buddy. Will try a couple "easy" spots. There's a smashed spot on the top corner of the bed rail and one on the tailgate that aint getting pulled out! Will see how hard it is on there and then if it works well enough try the cab spots.
    Honestly I think bondo would work fine around the windshield, just something new to try. And alot of it is not visible. I expect to skim coat it with bondo to finish. I don't expect I'll be able to get it perfect w lead, but wil see.
     
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  4. crpntr78

    crpntr78 Full Access Member

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    My dad used to solder metal house gutters together, he always used some type of acid to clean the metal with.
     
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  5. AKguy

    AKguy Full Access Member

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    I have been using 1” wide fine mesh fiberglass cloth and POR15 with good success. The mesh bridges well and the POR dries very hard. Used the silver POR on the rear window frame of my ‘73 Riviera project. 0A5CFC3E-99B8-4E00-AB2C-E9E3766D83AF.jpeg 1EE7990F-2846-462D-9B8F-67C026637624.jpeg 782981A8-FBE4-47EC-A9F8-72799B6DF72C.jpeg
     
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  6. Snoots

    Snoots Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Right!
    My fingers were typing faster than my brain was working.
     
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  7. Snoots

    Snoots Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    I have experience as far as doing it, but I'm not a pro by any measure. I've watched and learned from some pros. They're artists!
     
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  8. legopnuematic

    legopnuematic Full Access Member

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    I would try to zap the pin holes with mig, set some cardboard or something to contain the spatter and a few hits ought to fill them, likely less heat than would be experienced with leading there. My .02.
     
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  9. Snoots

    Snoots Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Lead melts around 330 degrees.
     
  10. Snoots

    Snoots Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Lead will fix some holes but don't expect it to have great structural strength.

    FUMES! DON'T BREATH 'EM!
     
  11. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    Duly noted, on both warnings. Structural strength not needed, this is only in the skin. The structural part of the cab is solid fortunately.
     
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  12. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    @AKguy, thanks for posting that up. My cab frame is pretty solid, not at the stage where I think I need to bridge any large holes. (Well 1 spot is, but I'm going to cut out and replace that with factory sheetmetal.
     
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  13. Blackbeard44

    Blackbeard44 Full Access Member

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    I had some bondo type stuff that had metal flakes you would add to it when mixing it up, for the life of me I cannot remember what is was called, the stuff worked very good I used it for all kinds of stuff. It wasnt made by bondo and I wanna say i got it a place that sells boat parts down by the scrap yards at Port of Tacoma by fife
     
  14. DBeck350

    DBeck350 Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Ahhh the 80s, big hair, Trans Am’s & Lead. A good friend did a quarter panel / roof section on an old Camaro back in 84 with lead. Small torch, flat iron, and sticks of lead and a lot of patience. Heated the metal slightly, warmed up the lead stick and smeared it into place. Like coloring with a fat crayon kinda process. He would smear it on then flat iron a little, hit it with the torch a touch and.... back to the beginning. It looked real purdy when he finished. Oh and he’s still around so apparently there’s nothing wrong with eating paint chips and breathing in the lead fumes!! He’s living proof and so are his 14 fingered kids.
     
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  15. jeff406cid

    jeff406cid Junior Member

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    I know they use brass as well for pinhole work. I saw them do it on American Hot Rod, Boyd Coddington shop as well as on on at least one other show. I'm sure it's much safer than working with lead.
     

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