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Electric vs mechanical fan

Discussion in 'Engine & Performance' started by Casey Little, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. Casey Little

    Casey Little Junior Member

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    Hello everyone, here is the situation. My current set up in my 1983 c10. 3 core rad, with full shroud, 7 blade metal fan driven by water pump fan clutch, also running a 160 thermostat. Truck is only driven during summer months, temp according to the gauge always hovers around the 160 mark.

    So onto my dilemma, I got a really really really good deal on some flex a lite electric fans, so I was thinking of installing a dual puller fan set up that's draws 2500cfm inside the shroud where it would cover almost the entire rad except maybe 2 inches on top and bottom. I want to run this set up with a relay and a thermostat switch.

    I may be over thinking this but I feel as though it may be counter productive. Reasoning is that by installing the thermostat switch that kicks fans on at 185 and off at 175 the coolant never gets back down around the thermostat temperature. Therefore running hotter and decreasing the power that would be gained from not running the mechanical fan.
    Please help.
     
  2. Arkansas_V8

    Arkansas_V8 Proud Redneck

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    If your mechanical fan works, then leave it.

    Avoid the wiring of electrical fans.
     
  3. Shorty81

    Shorty81 Baby Boomer

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  4. Casey Little

    Casey Little Junior Member

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    The wiring isn't the issue, I have rewired pretty much the entire truck, I'm just wondering if the added maybe 10hp would be worth the effort
     
  5. Madhorn

    Madhorn Full Access Member

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    I just converted from a belt driven fan to electric fans. Yes there was felt difference while driving it, but i could not even begin to guess at the gain. The main reason I did the conversion was to draw more air across the AC condenser when stopped or low speed driving in the woods. It gets hot here in Arkansas. BTW, the belt driven fan was working fine other wise.
     
  6. Arkansas_V8

    Arkansas_V8 Proud Redneck

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    No.
     
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  7. Arkansas_V8

    Arkansas_V8 Proud Redneck

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    It's not a big enough gain to feel. Did you fix something else?
     
  8. shiftpro

    shiftpro Full Access Member

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    I know the big tire trucks that get used out here, crawling slow at all elevations, they get hot. The successful formula with electric fans is way overkill (which I choose for certain uses) using large twin fans, 3 core diesel rads either factory or most usually aftermarket aluminum WITH ALUMINUM TANKS. Twin fans, each big enough to do the job on their own. A good fan controller like the Dakota Digital.
    High output alternator and big wires all the way.
     
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  9. shiftpro

    shiftpro Full Access Member

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    Oh and in the nature of over kill best of the best... Spal.
     
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  10. shiftpro

    shiftpro Full Access Member

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    With aftermarket fans, don't get dazzled by the cfm rating they use to sell the fans. They are not accurate and mean little in the real world. Look at the amps the fan pulls...
     
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  11. climb-101

    climb-101 Full Access Member

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    if it’s staying at 160 now then i would leave it alone, i wouldn’t be afraid of it running up around 210 either. running too cold can hurt the power the motor makes. on my chevelle, it made about 15hp more of it was running 210 degrees instead of at 160 degrees.
     
  12. shiftpro

    shiftpro Full Access Member

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  13. Arkansas_V8

    Arkansas_V8 Proud Redneck

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    Just go overkill. Two 12" electric fans, and a huge 4 core radiator. You need it.



    20190714_210946 (1).jpg
     
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  14. shiftpro

    shiftpro Full Access Member

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    More cubes and more compression = more heat.
     
  15. spanky55amg

    spanky55amg I'll give u $5, a hardy handshake, & 5 fish sticks

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    I have a CU370. It’s the spectra “big block” aluminum radiator. I think it’s actually dual core. I have some Chineseium fan/shroud combo I slapped on as I needed something electrical for the serpentine setup I put on.
    I have a 180° thermostat. I bought some relay kit online that I think is supposed to ground the fans and turn on/off at 170°.

    In 100°+ here in Texas, I run no hotter than half way on the temp gauge.

    I can’t tell ya if you’ll feel the HP.

    But I can tell you that the internal combustion engine wants to run hotter than 160°. Heat is a necessary byproduct of the internal combustion engine. And it’s not necessary for the fans to stop running. As long as the engine doesn’t over heat.
     
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