Tire time need thoughts on slight size change

SirRobyn0

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Yes Sir, makes sense, though seems I've noticed grippers on the front were harder to "push" through mud? Snow could be different? Any way, looks good and good luck with them Sir.

"I've noticed grippers on the front were harder to "push" through mud? Snow could be different?" On the farm most of my off the road driving is either on grass or mud that is only a few inches deep. I ran this same combination on my 2WD dodge and honestly I've run them like this for so many years that it's hard for me to compare them to a less aggressive tire. The main thing I'd say is that the fronts will grip better on ice than a regular all season, while we don't get really cold temps here we do get a good amount of morning ice in the winter time. I think they look good to thanks.
 

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There's more to adjusting tire pressure for best tire wear than only being concerned with the center of the tread surface. True, running more pressure than needed *may* cause the center of the tread to wear prematurely, but that is more of a factor with a lighter duty tire. Many heavier duty tires, like an E range, have a good strong carcass and higher pressure doesn't change the profile of the tread surface. Many times, more air pressure can actually prevent cupping of the tread. It's mostly an issue with front tires and not normally a factor on the rear.

If there's no noticeable difference in ride quality between 40/60 and 50/80, I would 100% go with the 50/80 setting. The tires are designed for that so center tire wear should not be an issue, cupping of the tread should not be an issue, and you won't have to air up for the heavier loads.
 

SirRobyn0

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Did the highway drive tonight mentioned earlier which in reality is only 23 miles. I'm not entirely convinced as to what I'm even feeling with what I've been calling a floaty rear end, after driving it for a longer period on the highway, but there is a sensation there. I'm actually thinking it's always been there to a lesser degree but is simply more noticeable now. Tire pressures do not seem to effect it, and at no point did I feel unsafe. I'll have a short 60 mile tow with the trailer this weekend, and while I'm only going to be putting a few hundred pounds in it, I should be able to feel if having the trailer back there makes a difference. As long as loading the truck, and towing the trailer doesn't magnify the issue I'm good with it as is if need be. I may try rotating the tires on Monday to see if that changes anything, that would tell me if it's a tire issue or a truck issue being magnified. I could also try wedging wood between the spring and frame, to eliminate a rear suspension issue for a short but uncomfortable test drive. So I've got a plan, but for now I'm at the wait and see stage, but not nearly as concerned as earlier.

Tire pressures: I'm sure I'll end up back at 50/80 for my convenience because of how much time I spend loaded, but I can see why lower pressures like 40/40 are appealing where it comes to muting bumps in the road and such, it just wouldn't work for me. The main point to testing lower pressures today was to see if it had an effect on the rear end thing which it did not and honestly I kind of expected that result.
 

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275/60/15 is what I got. 29" tall and white letters. I'm sure they're not perfect for snow and **** but, they are great burnouts tho. :burnout:

Oh and 30 to 35 psi. I don't like driving around on bowling balls. :rofl:

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White letters or gtfo! :peace: :patriot:

Love color matched rallys!
 

idahovette

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@SirRobyn0 is the ride smooth, balance wise? How much weight did you have to use? Will you recheck balance after a few miles?
 

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Been a while since you’ve had a new set of tires?
Sounds like a little tread squirm because they’re brand new.
Looks awesome btw!
 

SirRobyn0

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Been a while since you’ve had a new set of tires?
Sounds like a little tread squirm because they’re brand new.
Looks awesome btw!

And know that is very much a possibility, if that is the case I know it'll settle down. I've had the square 2 years and never had new tires on it. DOT codes on the old Toyo's show they were 15 years old, so you know those things where hard as well.
 
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I don't like any of the options, lol.

I'd go with a 285/75/16. Wider and taller. From personal experience, it helps with traction on soft ground and actually improves towing comfort greatly. No more swaying, it feels just plain stable as can be.
I’ve noticed after my new tires that sway was reduced as well not wider tires but wider tread contact area. If that makes sense. And softer rubber. Not oldas dirt.

op, if you don’t want to keep all tires able to rotate, you could have a narrower tire up front and wider in rear. Not unheard of mine are technically like that but it’s from the tire design. Hi
 

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@SirRobyn0 is the ride smooth, balance wise? How much weight did you have to use? Will you recheck balance after a few miles?

Well as you'd expect they are AT tires with deep tread depth so they took more weight than the average car tire. My wheels are still nice and straight and the AT's spun up nice and true as far as roundness. 2 tires took less than 2 ounces of weight total and two tires took more than 2 but less than 3 total. I remember back when I worked at a tire store sometimes we'd put an awful lot of weight on AT's. Interesting to note that my wheels seem to have a date stamp on them. All 4 were dated 1984, so I assume they are all original. Typically I'll rebalance at the first rotation, after that I'll only rebalance if I notice vibration.
 

SirRobyn0

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I’ve noticed after my new tires that sway was reduced as well not wider tires but wider tread contact area. If that makes sense. And softer rubber. Not oldas dirt.

op, if you don’t want to keep all tires able to rotate, you could have a narrower tire up front and wider in rear. Not unheard of mine are technically like that but it’s from the tire design. Hi

Thought about it, almost did it, but decided the wider tread patch for the front would help improve steering and reduce plowing of the front tires when on soft surfaces. I do have that problem with my Dodge which has bigs and littles. I will say that I do tend to like the look of a slightly narrower and shorter front tires though.
 

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Thought about it, almost did it, but decided the wider tread patch for the front would help improve steering and reduce plowing of the front tires when on soft surfaces. I do have that problem with my Dodge which has bigs and littles. I will say that I do tend to like the look of a slightly narrower and shorter front tires though.
wider tread in front is gonna make steering harder unless in normal driving you break traction steering which is a dangerous case of understeer ooooo
My truck does it in winter but i dont like to use it in winter. its just not the best for it, esp since the brakes arent good yet. both of them
 

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Well as you'd expect they are AT tires with deep tread depth so they took more weight than the average car tire. My wheels are still nice and straight and the AT's spun up nice and true as far as roundness. 2 tires took less than 2 ounces of weight total and two tires took more than 2 but less than 3 total. I remember back when I worked at a tire store sometimes we'd put an awful lot of weight on AT's. Interesting to note that my wheels seem to have a date stamp on them. All 4 were dated 1984, so I assume they are all original. Typically I'll rebalance at the first rotation, after that I'll only rebalance if I notice vibration.
date stamps on a 2000+ tire is{ DOT (wwyy) } while on older tires than 2000 it was DOT [wwy)

so a 1420 is 14th week of 2020 while a 319 could be 31st week of 1979, 1989, 1999
 

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@SirRobyn0 . that's NOT a lot of weight for that large of tire. Seems as tho you got a good set, some are not that easily balanced. I have always believed that it takes a few miles for the new tires to "seat" to the rims, hence the rebalance if you get a little "bounce". What kind of balancer do you use?...good for you on the wheels!!!
 

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A good tire place should have a machine that can machine the high spots of rubber off, but no one does. but tire manufacturers with tighter tolerances are less likely to have this problem,
 

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Just put on a set of NITTO Terra Grappler LT285/75R17 and they are a tad tall for the rear of the front fenders...: ( But I still like them.

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The brakes are Hummer with 4 puck calipers which required larger wheels from factory. I'm still thinking on what I am going to do with the fenders......lift, cut, body lift.......suggestions?
Zero rate blocks that move your axle 1” forward and up a bit too.
 

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