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TBI emissions control adventures

Discussion in 'Tech Discussion' started by Coal creek Chris, May 31, 2020.

  1. Coal creek Chris

    Coal creek Chris Member

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    My truck only has one sensor, in the driver's side manifold.
     
  2. Coal creek Chris

    Coal creek Chris Member

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    Didn't think anybody would want to see pics of emissions control stuff.
     
  3. bucket

    bucket Super Moderator Staff Member

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    The white wire at the coil is just a tach signal output.
     
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  4. Coal creek Chris

    Coal creek Chris Member

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    Looks like I can get Autoline rebuilt injectors for $26 each on Rock Auto. Doesn't seem too bad of a price.
     
  5. 1987 GMC Jimmy

    1987 GMC Jimmy Automobile Hoarder

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    I wouldn’t fool with remanufactured or even new ones that aren’t GM/Delco. I had a bad experience trying to save on injectors, it devolved into a huge hassle, and I did all that just to end up buying Delco anyway. Those’ll run you about $110 a pop, give or take, unless you find a damaged box or a restocked return. WitchHunter Performance is $23 per injector to clean and flow test, and if the coil passes resistance, I would send it on, save the money, and keep the good GM injector(s) rather than rolling the dice on a possibly crappy rebuild. If the injector coil’s dying, I would (reluctantly) dish out the big bucks for an OEM grade replacement.

    I calculated the Autoline back to $26 after the 10% rebate plus my state tax and postage, which I know that varies. Then you have to pay for the return postage to claim the core fee. You may know that, and it’s not a big deal for smaller parts, but it’s a deal murderer for large, heavy pieces. I found that one out the hard way, too. If your injector’s bad, and you want to gamble the appx. $30, I understand that. Delco and Autoline both have a 24 month warranty, but I trust the Delco part to last closer to indefinitely and not be back in the same boat closely following the warranty period’s lapse.
     
  6. Ricko1966

    Ricko1966 Full Access Member

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    FWIW the shop I used to work at we built a cheap rig to clean them and test flow a fuel pump a little fuel tank a resistor and a switch we could pulse them check flow run cleaner run through them.And what I saw for code 13 was o2 sensor circuit open.I'd check wire continuity .I also just did a quick check on the internet for obd code 13 I didn't check my books so if o2 circuit open is not the definition you are finding disregard what I said.I will tell everyone I've seen more good oxygen sensor replaced than bad ones.O2 code doesn't say bad sensor, it say circuit open, out of range, etc.many times the sensors doing its job letting you know it's too lean or to rich for it to read .They're easy to test I" 've never changed one without testing it first.Put a meter on it engine running get a stable reading, now create a vacuum leak that will make it lean watch your meter move, Now spray some carb cleaner down its throat that'll make it rich .If your still in doubt take it off put a meter on it and heat it with propane.Youll see if it works, doesn't work is lazy.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2020

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