Red Oxide Primer

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Shields

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Hello Everyone,

I’m in the final stages of the bodywork/paint for my truck. I’ve painted the whole front clip/cab/box in the Tremclad red oxide rust primer. It came out great! However, I’ve decided to go with a different (lighter) topcoat colour and so I’d like to give it a prime coat in grey to avoid any risk of bleed through. Am I alright to give this truck a coat or two of grey Tremclad rust primer on top of the red oxide primer without any strange reactions between the two primers?

Thanks for any input!

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CalSgt

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I tried looking up the tech data sheet for tremclad and all I could find was MSDS…

I’m not familiar with the stuff, I typically use epoxy primers and 2K urethanes. When I was looking for a TDS it seems like tremclad is advertised as an oil base product.
 

waterpirate

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Thick layers of primer are not your friend. I would shoot a test panel to check for coverage ability before I did anything else.
Eric
 

Ricko1966

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Tremclad is Canadian rustoleum and I know nothing about using rustoleum in this situation. I think the red rust primer is a tannic acid product,no idea on base solvent. I'd just call Rustoleum and ask them. As mentioned by someone else excessive film build us not your friend.
 
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Shields

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Thank you for the replies.

For more context - before I primered it I sanded the whole truck and finished with 220 and then 320 by hand. There’s two coats of tremclad red oxide on it now, I would like to give it 2 coats of grey primer like I mentioned before. Perhaps my best bet is to just buy a quart of the grey tremclad primer and test it on a small piece like the steps that go between the cab and rear fender.

I never wanted a stellar paint job (hence the $100 tremclad paint job), just something that looks half decent to the people who pull up next to me in traffic.


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Grit dog

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This topic comes up a lot.
It’s a lot of work to just use cheap rattle can products if you want it to last.
Think about where it’s stored too. Cheap paint doesn’t last long out in the weather. And the finish is, well, …..
Rule of thumb. Do it right and do it once.
IMO that doesn’t start with red iron primer.
 

Shields

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Grit Dog,

That’s a fair point and thanks for the input. I didn’t rattle can it though, I used an LVLP sprayer and reduced the primer 4:1 with mineral spirits but I understand it’s basically the same thing. I did tons of rust repair (cab corners, rockers, hood, fender, driver side door) but it was my first crack at body repair and though I’m happy with it, it did not come out perfect…not nice enough in my mind to spend $1,000 on primers and paints. I am perfectly okay with this truck having a subpar paint job…my pride and joy with this truck is the chassis and drivetrain.

At 28 years old and supporting a gf who’s going to full time university I simply don’t have the means to make this truck as nice as I want with the limited funds I have. My idea is to get the truck roadworthy now and enjoy it then when I’m in my 30s I’ll be better established and can make this truck truly beautiful.
 
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waterpirate

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My other two cents. You have come this far with prep work, your going to get a decent job. You do not want a problem with top coats peeling off primer or worse yet the base layer making the top coat soft. Call the factory help line and ask them.
Eric
 

mxer147

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I was challenged with that question for a few months and was going to go with your plan but ultimately decided against it because of UV protection; I just couldn’t find an oil base paint which could 100% claim UV protection. I decided to go with the summit line of single stage paint and primers. Yep, it was 2x more expensive but I hope to get better longer lasting paint job. This is a good read:

 

Grit dog

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Thank you for the replies.

For more context - before I primered it I sanded the whole truck and finished with 220 and then 320 by hand. There’s two coats of tremclad red oxide on it now, I would like to give it 2 coats of grey primer like I mentioned before. Perhaps my best bet is to just buy a quart of the grey tremclad primer and test it on a small piece like the steps that go between the cab and rear fender.

I never wanted a stellar paint job (hence the $100 tremclad paint job), just something that looks half decent to the people who pull up next to me in traffic.


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No, fair point bud. And I feel bad like I was ragging on your work. I wasn’t.
Looks pretty straight to me! And was also alluding to longevity like @waterpirate said.
You’re right, even post Covid you’ll spend the better part of $1000 on even good value primer and paint.
Truck looks badass. May be surprised how well it turns out.
Red oxide is an odd primer to use under automotive urethanes. May work fine, just no experience with it and not ready for an experiment.
Keep up the good work!
What color is it gonna be?
 

Old Guy Bill

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Oil based enamel primers & paints, over the years I’ve used it many times depending on what was being painted and the budget for the product.
Tractors and implements, race cars, etc.. mostly things that didn’t need to be great quality and would look okay from a distance.
I’d suggest thinning with acetone or xylene, instead of mineral spirits.
Also an accelerator/hardener can be added.
 

mano

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If you put a non-oil-based paint over an oil based primer, you may have issues with Fish eyes. I would prime a test panel and try painting the paint you’re gonna use on the truck over that. if fish eyes are an issue, you’re either going to have to sand off all of the oil based primer or use an oil based paint. I have painted things that I didn’t really care about with rustoleum and used harder for oil-based paint that I picked up at tractor supply along with the reducer, and they turned out and lasted way better and longer than I ever expected
 

romcjr

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Could you not just use a primer/ sealer over the red oxide ? IIRC it is a thin coating made to give a quality base . idk
 

Fat 454

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Hi @Shields - as a rule of thumb ( if you can't get any other info easily ) paint with "hotter" thinner can be over-sprayed with the same or a "cooler" thinner product. You can not get away with it the other way around ( cool primer, hot top coat ). What I am talking about in simple terms is a Mineral spirit ( turpentine ) is a "cooler" or less volatile thinner than a Xylene or MEK ( Methylethyl Ketones ) which are "hot" If you are not sure, drip some of each on to a metal worktop or other non painted metal surface, and see how long they take to evaporate. The "cooler" less reactive thinner will remain longer, and possibly even leave an oil residue. Also the "hotter" thinners have a much stronger smell.
Now that you have primed or base coated the truck in a base with a mineral spirit enamel, you need to stick with a similar style of thinner / paint type for the top coat, otherwise as posted above, you may get some icky reactions.
FWIW I use red oxide as a base on all the tractor repairs I do, and top coat with straight tractor enamel. Its simple, cheap, "relatively" enviro friendly, and hard wearing. It also replicates the OEM system.
For a truck I tend to go straight enamel with a Xylene or similar thinner, followed by a similar thinned single stage enamel top coat.
Also as posted above, if you are not sure - spray some metal scrap ( panel, door / sink / toolbox etc. ) with your chosen primer and topcoat combination first, to check you don't get a reaction.
I would also try to stick to a single brand - more likely not to have formula clash issues ( similar to described above ), and I really like Rustoleum products - good coverage and hard wearing.
Finally, if you are into "patina" ( whole 'nother post !.. ) - as you rub down the original factory paint coats you will find typically either a black or red primer base from the factory ( I think cabs were usually red, and fenders black ). This is a small but important detail often overlooked by people looking to replicate a factory paint job = good luck - post pics !..
 

Dennis71

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Looks like the color of my 75 GMC C150 Sierra. Rosedale red. Awesome job. Why not use a red tone paint. Sorry if i missed something. BTW, how do you get rid of little rust puckers, I have some industrial rust remover to apply, then what? I plan on painting same areas with a finish roller, as it has already been painted that way. It's just a work truck. thx
 

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