Fusible link replacement

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Ken B

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ok gotta ask , why non insulated crimp?
 

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Insulated crimps usually don't have any sort of heat shrink, just nylon or whatever tf it is. A plain splice will give you a clean crimp that you can slide heat shrink over to make it a sanitary install. Part performance, part looks when done right.

Some new crimps come with a heat shrink pre installed, which if installed carefully will be just as good, IMO.
 

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Insulated crimps usually don't have any sort of heat shrink, just nylon or whatever tf it is. A plain splice will give you a clean crimp that you can slide heat shrink over to make it a sanitary install. Part performance, part looks when done right.

Some new crimps come with a heat shrink pre installed, which if installed carefully will be just as good, IMO.
You have to have special crimping tools to not damage the ones with heat shrink pre-installed.
ok gotta ask , why non insulated crimp?
If you don't have the right crimping tool, the insulated crimps are garbage. If you are installing it in an engine bay or other areas exposed to water or the environment, you need to have it hermetically sealed to prevent corrosion anyways, and the regular "insulated" ones don't do that. The best thing to use for this in an easy to apply method is quality heat shrink tubing. You slide it over one side of the wire, crimp the wires together, then slide it back over the crimp and heat it up with a heat gun. Good quality heat shrink will have at least a 2:1 ratio and will create a weather seal as well as insulate the exposed area.

There are easy to use alternatives.. but they are more expensive and often require their own special crimpers to avoid damage. In aviation, it is common to use solder sleeves in areas that are exposed or heat shrink crimps.
Solder Sleeves:
https://racespeconline.com/products...fr3XYKyDZc-qWGj29KThq-1uRI1-kE_caAg0mEALw_wcB

Mil-Spec aviation grade butt splice:
https://racespeconline.com/products/raychem-mini-butt-splice

It should be noted that the proper crimper for those mil-spec butt splices costs $220. The only reason I use things like that is in critical things like EFI wiring harnesses and I'll set everything up and then borrow the crimping tool from one of my A&P coworkers for a day or two.
 

Ken B

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volumes of great information here as usual. thanks guys
 

Matt69olds

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I’m pretty sure the wire inside a fusible link is the same as regular wire, just a smaller wire size than the circuit it’s protecting. It’s the insulation that’s different, it’s fireproof/extremely high heat to prevent melting.

Definitely use the proper crimpers. Don’t use cheap butt connectors, and use heat shrink with the glue inside. Of all places, Harbor Freight sells a storage box with various sizes of heat shrink with the glue.

The factory used splice clips to join wires. You can make a splice clip by using a crimp style spade terminal, cutting off the spade part, and just using the crimp. You could use a couple as needed, crimp them solid, preferably use solder, and cover the connection with environmentally sealed heat shrink.
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Radiohead

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You have to have special crimping tools to not damage the ones with heat shrink pre-installed.

If you don't have the right crimping tool, the insulated crimps are garbage. If you are installing it in an engine bay or other areas exposed to water or the environment, you need to have it hermetically sealed to prevent corrosion anyways, and the regular "insulated" ones don't do that. The best thing to use for this in an easy to apply method is quality heat shrink tubing. You slide it over one side of the wire, crimp the wires together, then slide it back over the crimp and heat it up with a heat gun. Good quality heat shrink will have at least a 2:1 ratio and will create a weather seal as well as insulate the exposed area.

There are easy to use alternatives.. but they are more expensive and often require their own special crimpers to avoid damage. In aviation, it is common to use solder sleeves in areas that are exposed or heat shrink crimps.
Solder Sleeves:
https://racespeconline.com/products...fr3XYKyDZc-qWGj29KThq-1uRI1-kE_caAg0mEALw_wcB

Mil-Spec aviation grade butt splice:
https://racespeconline.com/products/raychem-mini-butt-splice

It should be noted that the proper crimper for those mil-spec butt splices costs $220. The only reason I use things like that is in critical things like EFI wiring harnesses and I'll set everything up and then borrow the crimping tool from one of my A&P coworkers for a day or two.
All true, and thanks for going into the finer points deeper than I. My apologies for slacking on the obvious.
 

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