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Camshaft Install/Rocker Adjustment How-To?

Discussion in 'Engine & Performance' started by da_raabi, Jul 8, 2019.

  1. Snoots

    Snoots Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    It's slow good!
    A wise mechanic once showed me a trick with STP.
    Before he performed other routine maintenance on a vehicle, he would set the can of STP on the hot engine.
    Sure made it pour a lot faster!
     
    Crispy and Blue Ox like this.
  2. QBuff02

    QBuff02 I like Big Blocks and I cannot lie

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    You're actually kind of right. My Engine Builder friend even says that an old "seasoned" engine doesn't experience the fallout of additive deficient oils of today. but he says a modern build without thousands of miles of hot/cold cycles and hardening will most certainly wipe a cam in short order. He just had a perfect example of it this spring. He had built a 383 for an older retired gentleman for his 70'something Corvette in town a few years ago, Steve even went so far as to install, break in and service it for the nice old boy when needed, using Wix filters and in this engine he ran shell rotella with a bottle of zddp additive religiously. Only problem is this year he was too busy when the guy got it out to service it and he was going on some cruise so he took it to a local service shop who "just changed the oil" and checked it over. Needless to say the car made it about 150 miles after the local guy serviced it and was developing a tick/miss. So Steve gets ahold of it to figure it out for him and there were multiple cam lobes and lifters wiped and/or damaged already, metal throughout the engine. He calls the local shop about it.. "Pennzoil 10w30 is what I put in it". And no, no additive. So the ol' boy got a freshening up of the complete engine and an expensive lesson. And that's the day I learned that you make sure you put the right oil with a zddp additive in it in these old flat tappet engines if you want them to live.
     
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  3. idahovette

    idahovette Full Access Member

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    Yes I have some GM additive ,used to be called EOS, Engine Oil Supplement. We put a 16 ounce can of it in each new rig we sold at the dealership back in the day(68-80). They still make it and it's a lot more expensive, but it's a lot cheaper than me having to pull the engine and go through everything again!!
     
  4. DoubleDingo

    DoubleDingo Vacuum Leaks, The Root Of All Evil

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    I installed a new cam, broke it in, changed the oil, then took it across the southwestern USA on a 3,000+ mile trip. That may have hardened the cam some...lol...but I still use the zinc because I am not taking chances.
     
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  5. Mr. Gutwrench

    Mr. Gutwrench Junior Member

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    Before installing the new hydraulic lifters let them soak submerged in oil for a couple hours. After they have soaked for awhile, and while in the oil, stand them up and push down on them with a push rod. If there is little give, they are ready to install. The following is from the GM manual. This only requires turning the engine over 1x.

    VALVE ADJUSTMENT
    1. Remove the rocker arm covers.
    2. Crank the engine until the mark on the torsional
    damper lines up with the center or “ 0 ” mark on the
    timing tab (figure 72). The engine must be in the
    number one firing position. This may be determined
    by placing fingers on the number one cylinder’s
    valves as the mark on the damper comes near the
    “ 0” mark on the crankcase front cover. If the valves
    are not moving, the engine is in the number one
    firing position. If the valves move as the mark comes
    up to the timing tab, the engine is in the number six
    firing position and should be turned over one more
    time to reach the number one position.
    3. With the engine in the number one firing position as
    determined above, the following valves may be
    adjusted:
    — Exhaust - 1, 3, 4, 8
    — Intake - 1 , 2, 5, 7
    (Even numbered cylinders are in the right
    bank; odd numbered cylinders are in the left
    bank, when viewed from the rear of the
    engine.)
    4. Back out the adjusting nut until lash is felt at the
    pushrod then turn in the adjusting nut until all lash
    is removed. This can be determined by rotating the
    pushrod while turning the adjusting nut (figure 73).
    When the play has been removed, turn the
    adjusting nut in as follows:
    — 5.0 L and 5.7 L engines: One full turn.
    — 7.4 L engines: 3U turn.
    5. Crank the engine one revolution until the pointer
    “ 0 ” mark and torsional damper mark are again in
    alignment. This is the number six firing position.
    With the engine in this position the following valves
    may be adjusted:
    — Exhaust - 2, 5, 6, 7
    — Intake - 3, 4, 6, 8
     
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  6. idahovette

    idahovette Full Access Member

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    NO on the one full turn, I always go 1/2-3/4 turn.
     
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  7. Mr. Gutwrench

    Mr. Gutwrench Junior Member

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    Agreed. I always went 3/4 turn.
     
  8. trukman1

    trukman1 Full Access Member

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    Loads of videos on You Tube to look at to make it simple.
     
  9. Jerry phillion

    Jerry phillion Full Access Member

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    Kendall makes a great 20/50 oil with zinc added. I've used this
    Oil four at least 5 years . No problems. Note! They only make it in the 20/50 viscosity.
     

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