1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

350 Casting Numbers

Discussion in 'Engine & Performance' started by Marcus, Jun 3, 2019.

  1. Marcus

    Marcus Full Access Member

    Posts:
    71
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2019
    Location:
    Gans, Ok
    First Name:
    Marcus
    Truck Year:
    1985
    Truck Model:
    GMC K1500
    Engine Size:
    305

    Okay thank you! Mine has the angled bolt holes.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
  2. legopnuematic

    legopnuematic Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Posts:
    696
    Likes Received:
    742
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2016
    Location:
    MO
    First Name:
    Spencer
    Truck Year:
    1976, 1979
    Truck Model:
    C10 Cheyenne, C10 Big Ten
    Engine Size:
    350 c.i., 350 c.i.
    You learn something new everyday! I never put any thought into that as all my small blocks use the 168 tooth flexplates so I never really needed to figure that out.
     
  3. Rusty Nail

    Rusty Nail Build the wall - deport them all! Supporting Member

    Posts:
    4,082
    Likes Received:
    2,006
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2015
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    First Name:
    Rusty
    Truck Year:
    1977,1988
    Truck Model:
    C20, K5
    Engine Size:
    350, 350
    AC Delco filter #1218.
    That's the one you want...
     
  4. arbea

    arbea Junior Member

    Posts:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    May 11, 2018
    Location:
    Gilbert, MN
    First Name:
    John
    Truck Year:
    1986
    Truck Model:
    c10
    Engine Size:
    305
    Marcus likes this.
  5. MikeB

    MikeB Full Access Member

    Posts:
    1,103
    Likes Received:
    228
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2014
    Location:
    Plano, TX
    First Name:
    Mike
    Truck Year:
    1982
    Truck Model:
    C10
    Engine Size:
    355
    The "010" block is probably the most common 4-inch bore block Chevy ever made. One of David Vizard's books says it was used for 68-79 350s and for high-performance 68-69 327s. Some had 4-bolt mains, other 2-bolt. There were something like nine other casting numbers for 68-79 350 blocks.

    You can use any diameter vibration damper, although 8-inch was used for high performance and probably truck engines. Doesn't matter which flywheel or flexplate you use with either size damper, since the engines were internally balanced until 1986. The exception would be the 400 small block.
     
    Marcus likes this.
  6. Marcus

    Marcus Full Access Member

    Posts:
    71
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2019
    Location:
    Gans, Ok
    First Name:
    Marcus
    Truck Year:
    1985
    Truck Model:
    GMC K1500
    Engine Size:
    305

    What size bolt do y’all use for this? Or what kind of tool other than a socket or the actual puller. I don’t have a puller so have to do it the poor boy way
     
  7. CoggedBelt75

    CoggedBelt75 Full Access Member

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    1,655
    Likes Received:
    2,461
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2010
    Location:
    Altus, Oklahoma
    First Name:
    Joe
    Truck Year:
    1975
    Truck Model:
    C10
    Engine Size:
    383
    We used to use grease packed in the hole & a bolt way back when. Just don't get carried away with the hammer. This guy has a cleaner idea, no matter how silly it seems.

     
    Marcus likes this.
  8. MikeB

    MikeB Full Access Member

    Posts:
    1,103
    Likes Received:
    228
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2014
    Location:
    Plano, TX
    First Name:
    Mike
    Truck Year:
    1982
    Truck Model:
    C10
    Engine Size:
    355
    I can't see why you need to remove it to bolt on a flexplate. ???
     
    idahovette likes this.
  9. CoggedBelt75

    CoggedBelt75 Full Access Member

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    1,655
    Likes Received:
    2,461
    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2010
    Location:
    Altus, Oklahoma
    First Name:
    Joe
    Truck Year:
    1975
    Truck Model:
    C10
    Engine Size:
    383
    I haven’t messed with a standard since the late 80’s so someone correct me if I’m wrong. Doesn’t the hub actually fill the space the the bearing is occupying to the point where it’s an interference? If so, and the bearing is still in place, then the converter won’t be able to be fully seated. My fuzzy opinion FWIW

    FCDC08ED-2FDA-4005-8914-61CF5B64DB45.jpeg
     
    Marcus likes this.
  10. Bennyt

    Bennyt Junior Member

    Posts:
    14
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    May 17, 2019
    Location:
    Surprise
    First Name:
    Ben
    Truck Year:
    1977
    Truck Model:
    C10
    Engine Size:
    350

    May or may not depending on how long it is or if it was fully seated. But I agree with you and I would remove it. I usually use a slide hammer. Takes more time to set-up the tool, clean it and put it away then it does to remove it. Less than 5 minutes. I don't recall if I ever used the packed grease method but I remember my HS shop teacher teaching us that way.
     
  11. Bennyt

    Bennyt Junior Member

    Posts:
    14
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    May 17, 2019
    Location:
    Surprise
    First Name:
    Ben
    Truck Year:
    1977
    Truck Model:
    C10
    Engine Size:
    350
    My '89 GMC Jimmy V1500 was a police vehicle. Always confused people as it had single headlights, steel wheels, and other weird options. I bought it off the Sheriffs dept when they retired it at 99,000 miles. Had about 100 receipts in the glove box for the speedometer being verified for accuracy.
     
    Marcus likes this.
  12. Marcus

    Marcus Full Access Member

    Posts:
    71
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2019
    Location:
    Gans, Ok
    First Name:
    Marcus
    Truck Year:
    1985
    Truck Model:
    GMC K1500
    Engine Size:
    305

    I had to remove it so my torque converter will work properly. It had a 4 speed behind it in the jimmy that it was in. I’m putting it in an automatic truck so it had to be removed.
     

Share This Page