1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Wood heater/stove. What y'all think?

Discussion in 'Garage' started by wanderinthru, Oct 29, 2020.

  1. wanderinthru

    wanderinthru Full Access Member

    Posts:
    457
    Likes Received:
    489
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2020
    Location:
    Mid Point Route 66
    First Name:
    Shakey
    Truck Year:
    81, 70, 75, 84, 89
    Truck Model:
    K 10, C 30, K 20
    Engine Size:
    350
    My Pa's old axe. Head was made by a man in central Louisiana in the 50's who Pa bought it from. No end to the wood its split. I'll probably break another handle out of it, lol. 16067069278131428948915323956646.jpg
     
  2. Frankenchevy

    Frankenchevy Lying Dog-Faced Pony Soldier

    Posts:
    4,611
    Likes Received:
    4,699
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2018
    Location:
    USA
    First Name:
    Jeremy
    Truck Year:
    Square
    Truck Model:
    CUCV
    Engine Size:
    Small
    I wasn’t criticizing the build. As a matter of fact, I didn’t even realize there was a 90 off the back of it. That’s close enough. A lot of stove manufacturers have the chimney exit the back but specify to have a certain length of vertical after the 90 like you have done. Looks good
     
    MrMarty51 and wanderinthru like this.
  3. fast68chevy

    fast68chevy I am the original fast68chevy

    Posts:
    151
    Likes Received:
    67
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2020
    Location:
    LINCOLN IL
    First Name:
    RANDY
    Truck Year:
    1975
    Truck Model:
    C20
    Engine Size:
    350
    ok so how do you identify or determine what is real actual fire brick vs just regular building/construction brick, anyways??? because i am looking at putting in a wood burning furnace, with blowers and dual heat vent pipes,, on basement concrete slba floor and against a regular 1950s/era block wall, but I'd like to brick a pad on the concrete slab in the area where the furnace will be.
    also what is the best ay to protct sheld the ceiling/floor joists above the furnace area?

    the exhaust vent pipe flue will be going out throguh the block wall directly above behind the furnace, there iis already a large round, 8" or so, vent pipe hole for this ready to use. from an old 1950s stove or something, that was in existence in this same location, back in the day,,.

    at the garage we have a wood burning furnace like this that was installed when the garage was built in about 1994 and it has warped the vinyl siding on outside of the wall it is against.. it has gotten that hot many, many times.. hmm.. quite risky... only have a panel of concrete board on the wall behind it. and thats really all... and it has stainless double wall exhaust flu/vent piping across and out the end wall of the garage and up two stories way high. but the property insurance guy keeps insuring the place though,, lol
    have overheated it many many times over the decades,, and warped the inside ceiling of the furnace to where its dropping downi now, but so far havent burnt the shop down... hmm.. and i had nothing to do with the installation of this furnace, and i have never actually installed one either.. yet. but i plan on intalling one over here in my own place when i get my hanbds on a furnace or stove hopefulllly soon hmm.. i know where one actually is right now for cheap a block away form here like dirt cheap like 200 bucks think..... hmm.. and it is an actual double blower large full-blown wood furnace, i really should and need to jump on it asap... hmm.. and wow tht stainless double wall flu vent piping is not cheap at all! that stuff is a pretty penny!! it was at least a 100 bucks a section/piece, like at least ten years ago now :O had to replace it outside because the plain black tin stuff was rusting and bleeding/staining the vinyl siding horribly badly..
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2020
  4. fast68chevy

    fast68chevy I am the original fast68chevy

    Posts:
    151
    Likes Received:
    67
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2020
    Location:
    LINCOLN IL
    First Name:
    RANDY
    Truck Year:
    1975
    Truck Model:
    C20
    Engine Size:
    350

    no really heavy duty though like a splitting mall is.. is the only bad thing hm,mm.. IMHO.. but that really is nice old classic vintage axe though! aned i have a couple of these old vintage original axes around here myself.
     
  5. wanderinthru

    wanderinthru Full Access Member

    Posts:
    457
    Likes Received:
    489
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2020
    Location:
    Mid Point Route 66
    First Name:
    Shakey
    Truck Year:
    81, 70, 75, 84, 89
    Truck Model:
    K 10, C 30, K 20
    Engine Size:
    350
    Did not take it as critizim at all! Do appreciate your input!!
     
  6. MrMarty51

    MrMarty51 Full Access Member

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    5,035
    Likes Received:
    3,418
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2012
    Location:
    Eastern Montana
    First Name:
    Martin
    Truck Year:
    1978
    Truck Model:
    K20
    Engine Size:
    400
    Check fire codes for Your area.
    IIRC, in a garage or flammable situation, the height from the floor to the bottom of the ash pan, or stove, is suppose to be 16 inches.
    Better check the codes for Your area though.
     
    HotRodPC and wanderinthru like this.
  7. wanderinthru

    wanderinthru Full Access Member

    Posts:
    457
    Likes Received:
    489
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2020
    Location:
    Mid Point Route 66
    First Name:
    Shakey
    Truck Year:
    81, 70, 75, 84, 89
    Truck Model:
    K 10, C 30, K 20
    Engine Size:
    350
     
    MrMarty51, Paladin and WFO like this.
  8. HotRodPC

    HotRodPC Administrator Staff Member

    Posts:
    45,920
    Likes Received:
    6,325
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Location:
    OKC, OK
    First Name:
    HotRod
    Truck Year:
    85 K20 LWB / 86 K5
    Truck Model:
    Silverado / Silverado
    Engine Size:
    454 - Turbo 400 - 3.73 350 - 700R4 - 4.10
    That turned out good. Now you need one of them heat generated fans to set on top of it to blow the heat around a bit. I didn't even know those fans existed til I seen one on a guys video and thought WTH is that? It don't have any cords or anything going to it.
     
    wanderinthru and MrMarty51 like this.
  9. HotRodPC

    HotRodPC Administrator Staff Member

    Posts:
    45,920
    Likes Received:
    6,325
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Location:
    OKC, OK
    First Name:
    HotRod
    Truck Year:
    85 K20 LWB / 86 K5
    Truck Model:
    Silverado / Silverado
    Engine Size:
    454 - Turbo 400 - 3.73 350 - 700R4 - 4.10
    Good Point, and who cares about codes. There's a reason for that code and to be safe, it should be raised. The purpose is because many products that put off fumes, the fumes will fall to the floor and build up and any fire or ignition source will ignite the fumes and then you have an explosion. Granted, that is a big space and it would take an awful lot for something like that to happen. It's also not in a closet but still. Better safe than sorry. Not a bad idea to extend the legs a bit. You have a propane bottle valve go bad or gasoline fumes get anywhere close to it, then kaboom.

    That fan I mentioned would also be good for keeping fumes blown away from the stove too to prevent such an accident.
     
    wanderinthru and MrMarty51 like this.
  10. MrMarty51

    MrMarty51 Full Access Member

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    5,035
    Likes Received:
    3,418
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2012
    Location:
    Eastern Montana
    First Name:
    Martin
    Truck Year:
    1978
    Truck Model:
    K20
    Engine Size:
    400
    One time my ex BIL had a character installing a wood/coal stove in the BILs house. Now this was an old stove and it had a base with legs on it, legs about 10 to 12" long.
    I arrived at his house in time to watch them set the stove down on this sheet of asbestos backed tin fire proofing stuff. I told them they needed to install the base with the legs in order to keep the heat from the floor through air circulation, they blew me off.
    Fast forwards to a couple of days later when he and his near family was in Denver and his wife was home. I got a call at work from Her, Martin I can smeel smoke in the house and I dont know where it is coming from. I rushed to their house, went into the basement and, in less than a half an hour that red hot stove would have been in the basement. Buckets of water and got the fire in the stove drenched and the fire in the basement put out and told Her dont relight that thing ever again until that base is installed and a decent heat resistant base is made under it.
    i have installed way more stoves than anyone here can imagine and with following the codes of distances and a whole lot of common sense i have never had a bad experience.
    if someone wants to blow off My advice I say, go ahead, see what happens, and, i dont care what part of this USA You live in, there are fire codes for installing stoves and furnaces, and, if codes are not followed, good luck getting an insurance company to pay out if something blows up.
     
    Shorty81, crpntr78 and idahovette like this.
  11. wanderinthru

    wanderinthru Full Access Member

    Posts:
    457
    Likes Received:
    489
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2020
    Location:
    Mid Point Route 66
    First Name:
    Shakey
    Truck Year:
    81, 70, 75, 84, 89
    Truck Model:
    K 10, C 30, K 20
    Engine Size:
    350
    Was not meaning to sound rude. Neither do I have insurance. It's mine, if I burn it down it's my problem, no one else's. Its a metal building built in the 70's, it has some air flow. Doubt I would ever get a good enough fire in that thing to catch the concrete under it on fire....or even hot enough to pop.
    Again, not being rude.
     
    MrMarty51 likes this.

Share This Page