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Time for a new radiator

Discussion in 'Engine & Performance' started by Hatchet54, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. 73c20jim

    73c20jim Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    In all of our Corvette road race cars we took out the thermostat, ripped the guts out, put back the stripped piece as a restrictor, took off the fan, removed the fan shroud and ran about 210F for hours.

    Never had a problem with any of them in any outside temperature. Nothing to open and close to "regulate" temperature.

    Also ran an oil cooler and baffled oversize oil pan.

    Finished every race and usually first or second in class. (A Production 575HP L88 12.5 - 1 compression 427 CID openchamber)

    Won 2 SCCA Regional Championships.

    Maybe I don't know what I am talking about. Who knows.

    Until then we must agree to disagree.

    By the way, I am NOT wrong, and neither are you. We just disagree.
     
  2. 73c20jim

    73c20jim Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    By the way, I'm in Tombstone. Come visit some time and I'll give you the grand tour, and tell you the truth and the facts about it.

    Professional Tombstone tour guide.
     
  3. C10MixMaster

    C10MixMaster Full Access Member

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    sounds good might take you up on that some day
     
  4. Rusty Nail

    Rusty Nail Whatever! Supporting Member

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    Brass sure as heck won't leave you stranded like a plastic one will and I think that's why the General picked that metal over other materials. I think any measurable difference in cooling "efficiency" is negligible when faced off against durability. I'd rather lead with metal over plastic and know after I eave that i'll make it back.

    Lmfao @ " not like the thermostat in your house." :33:

    @Goldie Driver - boy was that a slow night at work! Lol sry to ramble ...:waytogo:
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2019
  5. 4WDKC

    4WDKC Full Access Member

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    ID like to see more details about that car if uyo want to pm me.
     
  6. 4WDKC

    4WDKC Full Access Member

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    yes a hot engien will operate and get better mileage because it is using less gas, we know this, it also produces less emissions. As stated many time one here who cars about mileage in a squarebody? Heres the other side GM isnt telling you those same engines make more power around the 180 temp.

    Who said anything about plastic end cap radiators? Those are replacement you buy at the parts stores, not aluminium radiators you buy to solve over heating issues like these.

    [​IMG]

    I have one similar with a 2 core that cools my vette better than the brass 4 core that was in it ever did and its lighter making the car faster.
     
  7. MikeB

    MikeB Full Access Member

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    Our trucks also came with a restrictive air intake system, tiny cast iron exhaust manifolds with single exhaust pipe, and skinny tires. Also, most of them had very crude emission controls systems that relied heavily on EGR, super-lean air/fuel mixture, and nowhere near enough spark advance. A lot of those systems didn't work well even when new, and caused sluggish performance, lean surge, and pre-ignition. Ah, those were the days.:confused:
     
  8. MikeB

    MikeB Full Access Member

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    Just read where the tanks are not plastic at all, but glass-filled nylon with a melting temperature of 425 degrees F.

    I've never seen an aluminum/plastic radiator fail in any of my daily drivers, some with well over 100K hot Texas miles. But I'll be the first to let you all know if/when my Square's 4-1/2 year old radiator fails. Then I'll go pick up a free replacement from O'Reilly Auto Parts.:)
     
  9. 4WDKC

    4WDKC Full Access Member

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    the one that was in my s10 started leaking at the seam for the tank, not the actual plastic melting.
     
  10. Goldie Driver

    Goldie Driver Full Access Member

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    LOL - all valid points !:D

    The mid 70s to mid 80s were somewhat dark times for automotive performance while the industry struggled with emissions standards as well as fuel economy standards .

    And, typically the cheapest fixes were what was tried first , and once warranty was up - Who are you?:buttkick:

    But, that is also the vehicles I had in my formative years, and they had metal radiators ...

    :dogpile:

    Too bad SEFI and strong overdrive transmissions weren't around in the 70's.

    It is what it is, or maybe I should say it was what it was.
     
  11. RecklessWOT

    RecklessWOT Full Access Member

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    Nylon IS a form of plastic.

    Nobody said the plastic was going to melt, they said it will FAIL. I've seen plastic tanks straight up fail or crack at least 4 times. Maybe not during normal use, but god forbid you overheat once or if it gets just a little too cold outside, boom that cheap shit will break. Not saying that aluminum doesn't cool well, it sure does, arguably better than brass/copper, but if you're gonna use it then you gotta get a full aluminum radiator with welded tanks, not that crimped onto plastic garbage. Sometimes the tank just cracks, sometimes it will seep at the seam or blow out completely - neither is acceptable. I have never had an old brass/copper radiator fail except on ONE extremely poorly maintained box truck at work that had well over a half million miles on it and was abused every day of its long tired life, and even then the tanks didn't fail, the fins simply corroded away so it had no real way to transfer heat

    4 1/2 years... some of the trucks on this forum have more than 40 years on that. Come back in the year 2060 and tell us how that cheap oreileys radiator is working out for you.

    Plus, a plastic tank radiator has gotta look pretty damn lame under the hood. Might as well get a plastic intake manifold, and some plastic body color matched bumper covers while you're at it. Wouldn't want anyone thinking you drive a real truck built out of metal or anything. Hell, just go buy a brand new car with Bluetooth and parking assist while you're at it
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2019
    Rusty Nail likes this.
  12. Frankenchevy

    Frankenchevy . Supporting Member

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    I’ve had two radiators with plastic end caps develop pin hole leaks. Both were over 150k and weren’t catastrophic. I noticed the residue and replaced shortly thereafter.

    Edit: point of this comment was that many oems have plastic ends on them and that any failure of them has been manageable/not catastrophic. If my radiator weren’t rebuildable I don’t think I’d worry about using a good quality aluminum one. Also, you can find aluminum radiators in black so they can look more oem.
    CC1CE234-2159-4A98-9D49-1BA13398D265.png
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2019
  13. Nonstop

    Nonstop Full Access Member

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    I have had plenty of copper/brass radiators shit the bed. I took the 4 core out of my truck when it started leaking. I put in an oreilly radiator. Well shit - it cools a lot better than the 4 core did! The Champion ones I run in my other cars gave me the same results!

    As for the oreilly one - if/when it takes a shit, warranty it out and have the new one in later that day or the next.

    In this area, most of the radiator shops have gone under. Finding one, driving some distance to drop it off, have it repaired a few days later, then drive back out to pick it up. Oh yeah, plus I can drive my truck to oreilly to pick up the radiator before replacing it! Can not take out the radiator that needs repair and then drive the truck to drop it off! Makes NO sense to keep the copper/brass unless to restore a vehicle.

    To each his own, but I am over the copper/brass radiators, especially when I see how efficient the new ones are!
     
    Blue Ox and C10MixMaster like this.
  14. Hatchet54

    Hatchet54 Full Access Member

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    I'm pulling the plug on a Champion this weekend.

    3 row or 4 row?
     
  15. 75gmck25

    75gmck25 Full Access Member

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    I wish we could cut off the debate about plastic tanks, since most new aluminum radiators sold for the squarebody are like the one pictured in post #36 - note that there are no plastic parts in that radiator! This is not a Honda or Toyota.

    I used the Champion 3 row for my '75 truck and the brackets and hoses all fit the same as stock. IIRC, the upper hose fitting is stepped so it can handle 2 different sizes of hose - a little odd, but it sealed well.

    I am using a high flow 195 degree thermostat (which appears to be a little off in calibration), and it lets the engine get up to a little over 190, then opens and the temp moves down to 185. It stays at that temp regardless of driving conditions. Its been about 90 degrees outside lately, and I could let the truck idle with the A/C on, run at 60 mph traffic, etc., and its always at 185. The temp is measured with a Stewart Warner mechanical guage, tapped into the cylinder head sensor port.

    Bruce
     

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