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Resurfacing rotors, drums (esp OE)

Discussion in 'Tech Discussion' started by AuroraGirl, Oct 20, 2020.

  1. Salty Crusty

    Salty Crusty Full Access Member

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    Use OEM rotors and drums until they are unserviceable.

    Unless, of course, you prefer having cheap Chinese rotors turned every year as they wear uneven.
     
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  2. 80BrownK10

    80BrownK10 Full Access Member

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    Just to let you know he is speaking the truth, giving you honest advice and really looking out for you. Trying to save you money and keep your vehicle safe.

    I am not saying for you to do this, but to tell you my honest opinion, in your buick, installing a rotor out of your pile that lightly scored will make no noticeable difference either. The pad will wear into the grove in a short time.

    When I was in high school and didn't have any money I ran scored rotors with brand new pads. It stopped fine and I don't believe I ever replaced the rotors on the next brake job...maybe I did I can't really recall. I did I think 3 sets of pads on that car and put 100k miles on that car till I passed it on in college.

    So I say all that, if one is smooth and no groves really, I'd clean the crud off with brake clean, install it with pads you have and not look back.
     
  3. 75gmck25

    75gmck25 Full Access Member

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    Its good to maintain your brakes, but you are overthinking it. Rotors do not need to be perfect. Lightly scored rotors work as well as brand new ones, and light rust will wear off the surface of an old rotor very quickly.

    The primary reasons to swap rotors or have them turned is that one is damaged (big divots, cracks, etc.), or excess runout makes the pedal pulse or steering wheel shake, or it is worn and too thin.

    The system is hydraulic, and therefore self compensating for wear differences, up to a point. The first time you step on the pedal it will take up the excess from wear. With one pad or rotor at 100% and the other at 50% it will stop just the same, and pressure on the pads will be equal.

    Bruce
     
  4. Salty Crusty

    Salty Crusty Full Access Member

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    When asked about turning the rotors, my Dad told the guy this story:
    A couple had 10 children in their old farm house. Time came for the 11th and they opted for a local hospital.
    After the delivery, the doctor asked if they wanted the little guy circumcised.
    Neither was familiar with the procedure, so the doctor explained it to them.
    The woman thought a minute, then told the doctor, "Naw, let him do just like his Daddy did, it'll wear until it fits just right".
     
  5. Octane

    Octane Full Access Member

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    I've pulled pads and rotors out of a junk yard and used them.I had an original rotor on one side and that junk yard rotor on the other,good surface already so I drove it and all was good.I personally buy newBosch rotors with success and longevity now that I make The Big Bucks.lol.
     
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  6. 80BrownK10

    80BrownK10 Full Access Member

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    Yep there is a lot of stuff that works. I am not advising anyone to do what I say I have done. I am just sharing my personal experience and saying that it works. I have also run rotors below minimum thickness...just don't let the pads go all the way down. I think a few of our points is that if you can live with thinks that many won't notice except the very pickiest drivers you will be fine and a lot better off than worn out brakes.
     
  7. AuroraGirl

    AuroraGirl Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Okay I should have used more appropriate wording. Ridges and grooves are common, the ones I have arent too bad ridges wise(I have one rotor that has them BAD but its definitely worn past) run out is definitely an issue on one. I know slight issues are correctable, for example, I took my passenger brakes off, sanded trhe pads and degreased and cleaned the rotor and instantly it was much better.

    on my driver side, I swapped pads front-back on the caliper bracket because the backside had a deep gouge that the pad couldnt correct becauuse it occured much deeper by another part, but its still shallow enough where i would feel the brake use will compensate for it, so i swapped because the other side had the opposite issue where the pad rode high up on the rotor and even removed the outer ridge on the rotor . So now the pad with the score, I also sanded it, i put on the front so it has rotor evening the gouge while the other side has an even pad that will help the rotor out. i can definitely tell the guide pins got cooked a little bit tho, that grease was nasty compared to passneger.


    Most of my brake issues have stemmed from PO and not using lubricant or cleaning the brake hardware, so pads stick in awkward positions or hold against the rotor while driving, causing wear
     
  8. shiftpro

    shiftpro Full Access Member

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    I got drums turned a few years back... I had to look high and wide to find a shop to do it. The local wrecking yard had a brake lathe and they did it after I begged. The owner said I would have to sign a waiver to keep them all safe and snug... but he never followed through and I escaped with my turned drums and no waiver.

    Shops these day, regarding brakes, only want to R&R everything... fix nothing just replace the whole kit and caboodle. Buddy paid almost $3000 (Beaver Bucks) for a full brake job on his Toyota Rudnut. They just rust away long before they actually wear out. Awesome quality.
     
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  9. AuroraGirl

    AuroraGirl Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    fortunately 2 shops in the nearest town do brake turning. mostly because they serve a lot of commercial equipment and bigger trucks so they keep all the old specialized machinery and have staff trained for it.Like if i wanted someone to screw out my 1946 asbestos shoes off the brake drum for my tractor and have a new set riveted on, they could do it. or i could buy linings and the tool. but workkkkkkk
     
  10. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    I have learned that letting pads fit rotors with small imperfections works just fine, which you also appear to know. What I found was the opposite wasn't true though. Had a set of high dollar brake pads. Old rotors had normal "grooves" in them. Rotors got warped and replaced with new. Re-used old pads. At first, car barely stopped, until the brake pads wore flat to the rotors. And after that, I think the pads were glazed partially form getting hot only hitting on the high spots and never did have anywhere near the same bite.
    The car still stopped better than average because they were 4 piston 15" Brembos on a midsize passenger car, but probably lost at least 1/3 of the braking function. Moral is, don't re-use pads that are already profiled to a particular rotor's defects.
     
  11. Bennyt

    Bennyt Full Access Member

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    Autozone and Oreilly Auto parts both turn Drums/ Rotors. It used to be free with purchase of pads/ shoes and then it was $10 but I had some drums done within the last 3-6 mos and I think it was $30. Some will turn flywheels as well.
    Most small independent auto parts stores turn them as well.
    It's the same brake lathe whether drums/ rotors.
    They also have the proper tools to measure, however they may not be proficient with use.

    I've been buying rotors/ drums from Summit to save on shipping vs. Rockauto when I need new if the local place doesn't have what I want.
     
  12. Galane

    Galane Full Access Member

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    Something I have done with brake pads that still had plenty of thickness but were worn crooked due to incorrect installation or had ridges from being used with grooved rotors is clamp them onto a milling machine and use a sharp but cheap end mill to cut the surface flat. Pinching pennies to go with new rotors but it worked just fine and gave the pads a fresh surface to wear in with the new rotor surface.

    Definitely want to hold a shop vac hose up to the milling action because that brake dust could be bad for the mill's table ways.
     

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