Gluing in the broke out piece

Raider L

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You just mix the two together and squirt the stuff out the calk gun in a bead. When it drys you just sand it like anything else. Cool, huh?
 

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@shifpro,

If you can find this glue, it is excellent at gluing plastic! If, that is, you can find it. You can get it on line for less than ten dollars. But, boy it works good. It's another fast work time adhesive I've found works on many hard to glue plastics.
 

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Pic.
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You may have to go on safari to find this stuff. If you have a Hobby Lobby in your town they may have it. You know how things are these days where if they don't sell a lot of it they won't reorder.
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See, it says "harsh conditions adhesive" and it ain't kiddin'!
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How about that, 758 psi shear! That may fix you tool good! And the mfg. in Germany by the Henkel Corp. as in WWII German Henkel aircraft!!
 
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Raider L

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@shiftpro,

As soon as you apply it it starts to set up so all you have to do is hold the parts together for a minute or two and then you can let go and after 24 hrs. it's hard just like that "Quick Grip" stuff. Now, what I've found is if you let it set for two or three days it's even harder. As long as you can stick the edge of your thumb nail into it it's still soft. Even though it's dry, it's totally cured state is what you want to shoot for.
 

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@shiftpro,

As soon as you apply it it starts to set up so all you have to do is hold the parts together for a minute or two and then you can let go and after 24 hrs. it's hard just like that "Quick Grip" stuff. Now, what I've found is if you let it set for two or three days it's even harder. As long as you can stick the edge of your thumb nail into it it's still soft. Even though it's dry, it's totally cured state is what you want to shoot for.
I'm sorry William there's a few glues being discussed here. Do you mean the Quick Grip?
 

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@shiftpro,

Yes. And the only other one is the Locktite made "Repair Extreme", if you can find it. But either one will glue that tool.
 

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@Raider L

A couple years ago a guy I use to work with taught me how to weld plastic with a soldering iron. It's really kind of an art form almost, you have to have some plastic just like the stuff your welding and , like welding metal, you have to melt in deep enough to get good penetration, hot enough to melt, but not so hot you burn the plastic, and fill with the correct plastic filler, or donor piece from the parts your welding together. Done right the welded part of the plastic will be stronger than the rest of the plastic. So these days I do a lot of plastic repair like that.
I’ve been doing this for years, you can blend/weave the broken pieces from the back side. It takes some time and practice,but from the front side the break will be had to find.
 

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@Corvette Ed,

"Weave it in"? Huh? What do you mean? Describe what you are talking about.
 

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@Corvette Ed,

"Weave it in"? Huh? What do you mean? Describe what you are talking about.
Kinda like a figure eight,back and forth over lapping motion blending the molten plastic from one piece to the other. Hope that helps. Take a few pieces of scrap plastic and a soldering iron and give it a try.
 

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Kinda like a figure eight,back and forth over lapping motion blending the molten plastic from one piece to the other. Hope that helps. Take a few pieces of scrap plastic and a soldering iron and give it a try.
This is pretty much the method I was taught.
 

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@Corvette Ed,

Oh, I've never heard of that before. I see you said using a soldering iron, but I'd have to see it done to understand the method. Is there a You Tube video I can watch to see the process done? And does the process have a name, like Sub Arc welding, etc.?
 

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A lot like welding steel.
For me when I was learning plastic welding my problem was I'd get it to hot and burn the plastic, you know with metal you can tell how hot it is by the color.
@Corvette Ed,

Oh, I've never heard of that before. I see you said using a soldering iron, but I'd have to see it done to understand the method. Is there a You Tube video I can watch to see the process done? And does the process have a name, like Sub Arc welding, etc.?
No idea. My soldering rig is at the shop and I won't be back there until next week. If I get a chance and a spare guy to hold my phone I'll shoot you a short video.
 

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@Corvette Ed,

Oh, I've never heard of that before. I see you said using a soldering iron, but I'd have to see it done to understand the method. Is there a You Tube video I can watch to see the process done? And does the process have a name, like Sub Arc welding, etc.?
Stirring the molten puddle. Actually NOT what you would do welding metal.
 

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