Gluing in the broke out piece

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,766
Reaction score
828
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
pics.
You must be registered for see images attach
Well, this is what happens when you don't finish the fit up. You find out that when the lower trim is put in my little sculpted piece is off by a quarter inch. Oh well, time to get the Dremel tool out again. I was going on the straight line at the opening for the edge of the trim piece. I thought that that line was a good place to cut it off. I don't know why that didn't work. Oh well.
You must be registered for see images attach
Okay, done. It didn't take but a couple of minuites to get it right. And now we have a piece that fits when everything else is in place that needs to be in place. Don't worry about the bottom of my piece, it's just I don't have the lower trim part screwed in tight on the other side. It'll be okay. But now it's ready to glue in.
You must be registered for see images attach
Here it's lined up pretty good. It was that little tip right at the edge where it's bent over to form the circular opening that I had to make sure was cut correctly. It would hold the whole piece off if that tip wasn't cut down right. The trim piece is in on both sides, and after I made sure they were in that's when I knew it was reshaped right and ready to glue finally.
You must be registered for see images attach
I am well experienced in gluing plastics. This is the best for most all plastics. It sets up fast, holds initial strength in about a minute or two, and cures hard in twenty-four hours. But do you know why I can glue something like this piece with confidence? Because I had kids who played with toys and didn't have the money to replace them. So I fixed them. When the little kid is standing there crying their eyes out holding two pieces in their little hands, you have to get creative...fast! But fix it with what? A nail? A piece of string? I went through all the Super Glue(s), polyvinyl chloride adhesives, and glue for poly styrene, and all the other crap they make plastic toys out of. I know what works and it ain't Super Glue! Super Glue is good for some poly styrene's, but it ain't worth a crap for some other plastic toys made in China out of who knows what the heck it is. So I know my glues and what works, and what doesn't on whatever it is you need to glue. Now, the other thing is, why bother with it? If it's broke just throw the thing in the trash, or tell the kid to play with it broke. Really? Really? Well, since I'm a fixer to begin with, I wanted to see if I could fix it. Besides that garners hope in the heart of the kid if you at least make an effort to make those tears go away. If you don't have kids then you'll never know the look on that kids face when in a couple of days you hand them back what was broke, now it's whole. And they give you this look like you just performed some miracle. Their Beatleborg, Power Ranger, or Teenage Ninja Turtle action figure is now ready for battle, or what's better, that Barbie doll is ready for the runway!!
 
Last edited:

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,766
Reaction score
828
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
pics.
You must be registered for see images attach
Oops. I know even if this pic is blurred, the gluing doesn't look good.
You must be registered for see images attach
This is clearer. Tomorrow this will be hard and I can clean it up. I had to hold it for about ten minutes then gently put the lower trim piece in place. I knew it was set and wouldn't fall off, but I had to touch it in a couple of places so I could see if it was flush. That's why it looks crusty in a few places but it's okay. Tomorrow I'll sand it down smooth and it'll look a lot better. I'll dab some paint on it to. I had to touch it and push on it while it was in place due to this type of glue sets up fast. That's why I like it. It's called "working time" and with this glue it's like less than five minutes. The whole time it's setting up it says to speed up drying slightly pull the pieces apart and press back together 3 to 5 times. I rely on my experience dealing with these kinds of glues as to whether or not to do that. In this case it's better not to do that. I didn't want it to come out of alignment to much because the glue is setting up. I'll guanartee you it will be okay. It's on there once you put the two pieces together so you had better have it lined up the first time. That's why it's fuzzy and crusty looking is because the glue was already drying and I touched it pulling off some of the surface. But the two pieces are together firmly. As in most cases these types of adhesives, the glue melts the pieces together and as the chemical reaction is taking place it's hardening.
 

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,766
Reaction score
828
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
So if any of you have a piece that's cracked or broken off, use this type of glue on it. Put a string of it on one side only and press the pieces together firmly. You can lift the pieces apart a slight bit and press back together once or twice. It will start setting up right away but continue to hold the pieces together. You won't be able to tell they are stuck well enough until after about five minutes, if you can tape the pieces together to hold them that'll work, and then you can just leave them overnight. After about ten minutes the pieces will be well stuck but don't put any load on them until they've dried for at least overnight, 24 hrs., not, "Hey, I glued them late last night and it's 7 am, are they dried yet?" NO, If you glued them together late last night wait until late tonight to try them. They'll be stuck good. And here's a test. I glued these two pieces of scrap plastic of the same materials, last night so I could see how well this plastic was going to perform together.
 
Last edited:

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,766
Reaction score
828
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
pics.
You must be registered for see images attach
The above pic is of the same material that I made the broke piece with. I don't know what it is, maybe polystyrene? I got kinda messy with applying it along the side. I wanted to just put it on the edge. That's the way to test it. Anyway, the vertical piece was straight against the piece that's laying down on the rag, except for about 3/8" of the other end. So let's see what happens when I put some weight on it.
You must be registered for see images attach
It looked like it stretched a bit at the place that wasn't flat down on the piece that's being held by the vice. But the rest of it is holding good.
You must be registered for see images attach
And here's what's hanging by that string, two ten pound barbell weights. That's twenty pounds hanging by that hole on these two little pieces of plastic glued together by that glue I used on my broke out piece.
You must be registered for see images attach
And here's where it stretched a bit, but only so far and then it stopped. I don't think there will ever be twenty pounds on any part of that instrument panel.
 
Last edited:

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,766
Reaction score
828
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
Of course I put a "shear" load on the joint. So we know it will hold at least twenty pounds of shear load. If I was to test it like the glue lab did the pieces would have been perfectly straight and glued with a single thread of glue on only one piece. Then hang weight on it like I did, but also hang weight on it left and right to see if it can take torque loads to see what it would take to break it off and how much weight it took to tear the pieces apart. But I'm not a test lab. I've used these glues, Super Glue and the like for decades. I don't know what they did to Super Glue, but I can tell you I've used it since it came out in the '70's. It's not as strong as it used to be, or glue as many things as it once did. I remember the commercials on TV with the guy hanging by his helmet held up by a crane. Yeah, they took two flat pieces of no telling what, probably plastic, or Aluminum, steel, glued them together, and screwed them to a plastic helmet and the guy is probably two feet off the ground. Which is okay, but I remember he was whirrling around pretty good. That glue used to glue a lot more than it does now. When it first came out I heard of a lot of people who had themselves glued to some bad places of their bodies, or somebody else's body parts, who had to go to the emergency room. No one knew how to melt the stuff to get skin apart. If you've not ever had your finger tips stuck together, do not try to pull them apart! It said Acetone on the tube would melt it. But are you going to pour strong solvent on your testicles to get your hand off yourself?
 

SquareRoot

Full Access Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2017
Posts
2,024
Reaction score
2,710
Location
Arizona
First Name
Mike
Truck Year
85
Truck Model
K20
Engine Size
350
But are you going to pour strong solvent on your testicles to get your hand off yourself?
There are those who get their hands stuck on their testicles and those who lie about it. Just hope it doesn't happen at the Christmas Party.
 

SirRobyn0

Full Access Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2019
Posts
2,957
Reaction score
3,068
Location
In the woods in Western Washington
First Name
Rob
Truck Year
1984
Truck Model
C20
Engine Size
350
@Raider L I've used super glue and keep a tube just about everywhere. I've never used quick grip but will keep it in mind. I remember at one time we use to have a two part super glue type product at the shop. It wasn't really an epoxy I don't think, it acted much more like a super version of super glue and would pretty much stick anything together for life. I no longer remember the products name and it doesn't really matter because it's been unavailable for years now.

A couple years ago a guy I use to work with taught me how to weld plastic with a soldering iron. It's really kind of an art form almost, you have to have some plastic just like the stuff your welding and , like welding metal, you have to melt in deep enough to get good penetration, hot enough to melt, but not so hot you burn the plastic, and fill with the correct plastic filler, or donor piece from the parts your welding together. Done right the welded part of the plastic will be stronger than the rest of the plastic. So these days I do a lot of plastic repair like that.
 

Goldie Driver

Full Access Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Posts
3,670
Reaction score
5,625
Location
Houston, Texas
First Name
Britt
Truck Year
1980
Truck Model
GMC K1500 Suburban
Engine Size
350
There are those who get their hands stuck on their testicles and those who lie about it. Just hope it doesn't happen at the Christmas Party.

Well, don't pull an American Pie & keep the Super Glue next to the lube on the counter while watching pron and all is good.

:Big Laugh:
 

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,766
Reaction score
828
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
@SirRobyn0,

Yes, it is called plastic welding. I wished that I had had the chance to learn how to do it. The better kits/plastic welding equipment to do it comes with a hot air gun and that's what melts the filler rod and the base material. And yes you are correct the joint is usually stronger than the plastic base material. And yes the filler rod is the same as the base material being welded. You can go on line and there is a lot about it including companies that develope the filler rods and the equipment to weld with, hot air guns with different kinds of tips to focus the hot air. Look that up, you all might want to invest in the equipment. When I first heard about it I got really excited because I had been thinking about how to do it without the use of glue or some other chemical like something that's used out of a calk gun type of application.

I used to have the two part auto plastic calk such as the plastic around or behind the bumper or the plastic bumper itself to do repairs of it. I was going to try it out on my wifes car in a couple of places. It bonds the broken plastic bumper or the parts of the car that are plastic that are broken that can be repaired rather than replaced, as in the parts have a crack in them from an accident or something. I learned some repair shops use it. You mix the compound together then put it in the calk gun, the kind that has air power to push it out into a bead. You can use a regular calk gun to apply it to. Then apply it. But welding plastics is exciting to me. Even though I would never have the opportunity to use it that's why I said I wish I had had the chance to learn how to do it since I am a welder with a lot of experience.
 

shiftpro

Full Access Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Posts
4,704
Reaction score
5,647
Location
BC Canada
First Name
shiftpro
Truck Year
73-87
Truck Model
1500, 2500, 3500
Engine Size
350, 383, 454, 496!
Of course I put a "shear" load on the joint. So we know it will hold at least twenty pounds of shear load. If I was to test it like the glue lab did the pieces would have been perfectly straight and glued with a single thread of glue on only one piece. Then hang weight on it like I did, but also hang weight on it left and right to see if it can take torque loads to see what it would take to break it off and how much weight it took to tear the pieces apart. But I'm not a test lab. I've used these glues, Super Glue and the like for decades. I don't know what they did to Super Glue, but I can tell you I've used it since it came out in the '70's. It's not as strong as it used to be, or glue as many things as it once did. I remember the commercials on TV with the guy hanging by his helmet held up by a crane. Yeah, they took two flat pieces of no telling what, probably plastic, or Aluminum, steel, glued them together, and screwed them to a plastic helmet and the guy is probably two feet off the ground. Which is okay, but I remember he was whirrling around pretty good. That glue used to glue a lot more than it does now. When it first came out I heard of a lot of people who had themselves glued to some bad places of their bodies, or somebody else's body parts, who had to go to the emergency room. No one knew how to melt the stuff to get skin apart. If you've not ever had your finger tips stuck together, do not try to pull them apart! It said Acetone on the tube would melt it. But are you going to pour strong solvent on your testicles to get your hand off yourself?

What type of glue will hold that nylon (or is it fiberglass?) reinforced plastic? The material they make cordless tools from, for example. It seems the best I can find only forms around the broken joint and 'suction cups'... not melting into the parent material.
 

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,766
Reaction score
828
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
@Goldie Driver,

How'd you like my demo of the test I devised on that scrap pieces. Lol. I had never done that and thought it would be interesting to see just how strong that glue actually was. Now I know. I need to test some Super Glues to and some other adhesives the same way. That would be interesting. Actually the tests would be more affective if done on video. Especially if the piece fails, you'd have to see it fail. You couldn't just take a still picture of the weights laying on the floor. What would that prove?
 

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,766
Reaction score
828
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
@shiftpro,

You might try the glue I show, the "Quick Grip". Just follow the directions to some degree and give it the 24 hrs. to cure and it should work on that material. It's the best I've found to bond most plastics.
 
Last edited:

Goldie Driver

Full Access Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Posts
3,670
Reaction score
5,625
Location
Houston, Texas
First Name
Britt
Truck Year
1980
Truck Model
GMC K1500 Suburban
Engine Size
350
@Goldie Driver,

How'd you like my demo of the test I devised on that scrap pieces. Lol. I had never done that and thought it would be interesting to see just how strong that glue actually was. Now I know. I need to test some Super Glues to and some other adhesives the same way. That would be interesting. Actually the tests would be more affective if done on video. Especially if the piece fails, you'd have to see it fail. You couldn't just take a still picture of the weights laying on the floor. What would that prove?

Yeah, I could see videos of glue tests as being entertaining.
Destruction usually is, except for that red 3 quarter ton 4 by that was bought and destroyed...

:flame:
 

SirRobyn0

Full Access Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2019
Posts
2,957
Reaction score
3,068
Location
In the woods in Western Washington
First Name
Rob
Truck Year
1984
Truck Model
C20
Engine Size
350
@Goldie Driver,

How'd you like my demo of the test I devised on that scrap pieces. Lol. I had never done that and thought it would be interesting to see just how strong that glue actually was. Now I know. I need to test some Super Glues to and some other adhesives the same way. That would be interesting. Actually the tests would be more affective if done on video. Especially if the piece fails, you'd have to see it fail. You couldn't just take a still picture of the weights laying on the floor. What would that prove?
I would find that interesting. If you do shoot a video I'd for sure watch it.
 

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,766
Reaction score
828
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
@SirRobyn0,
Here's that automotive adhesive I was telling you about. Ever heard of this stuff? It's kinda old and it may not be available anymore.
You must be registered for see images attach
You must be registered for see images attach
You must be registered for see images attach
I can't believe it's sideways. anyway, it says "vettes".
You must be registered for see images attach
If you look at this listing of all the plastics this stuff fixes you'll see this stuff and other adhesives like it were pretty dang good at gluing everything. I had forgot about Polycarbonates, hard plastics. You can mix up any amount you need. You don't have to use another calk gun to use a lot of it. You can mix it in those little cups, mix with the wood sticks.
 
Last edited:

Forum statistics

Threads
35,833
Posts
755,260
Members
24,849
Latest member
redc20qwerwqer
Top