Factory-correct Restorations vs Restomod values in the new Artice by CARiD

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carid

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The collector car hobby in the United States began back in the 1930s, when a small group of auto enthusiasts recognized that there might be historical value in preserving examples of the original “horseless carriages”.

After World War Two, Baby Boomers fueled the hobby’s growth as they collected the cars of their youth. These hobbyists, interested in cars of the 1950s, ‘60s, and ‘70s, often began with rusty worn-out hulks needing complete overhauls. This in turn fed an expansion of restoration shops, aftermarket parts, and the tools and supplies to support it all.

The old car hobby has traditionally preferred factory-correct restorations. Younger generations are bucking that trend. Is that shift helping or hurting values? Read the full article on CARiD to find out!

 

fast 99

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Based on the last BJ auction nice customs bring the money.

However, I follow stock Mustangs they are up in value over a few years ago. Probably 20-30%.

Corvettes, Chryslers and other GM cars are also up.

I did notice most of the buyers are middle age. Could be there is more disposable money right now or speculation from an investment point of view.

No matter the reason it's an interesting market right now.
 

1STLS1

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An honest answer, '65 Mustangs really didn't start, stop or steer that great to begin with and their short comings are more apparent once compared to new cars. The advancements todays vehicles have made, that people appreciate and enjoy, when added to a classic car adds value to it. Instead of just being a collectable it's more of a statement about the person who owns it.
 

fast 99

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An honest answer, '65 Mustangs really didn't start, stop or steer that great to begin with and their short comings are more apparent once compared to new cars. The advancements todays vehicles have made, that people appreciate and enjoy, when added to a classic car adds value to it. Instead of just being a collectable it's more of a statement about the person who owns it.
That could be part of it. Agree, old cars like SB trucks are noisy, crude, and require more attention than many newer cars. That would explain the customs with modern suspension and conversions to LS and Coyote engines.

Have never done a custom, just stock restorations. Have no idea what time and costs would be. Probably the first one would be a break-even proposition at best. Then after gaining the knowledge, it might be a money maker. The prices they sell for is up there.

I do know of 2 local people that sold cars at the last BJ auction. Both were customs and both were up 100k before fees and transportation.
 

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