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Radiator overflow nipple broken.. options?

Discussion in 'Engine & Performance' started by AuroraGirl, Jul 4, 2020.

  1. SquareRoot

    SquareRoot Full Access Member

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    I can get them cheaper than a turbo, as long as it's not a Chinesium turbo.
     
  2. SquareRoot

    SquareRoot Full Access Member

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    The voice of reason. Couldn't agree more. Even with SAE " fine thread" you might get 2 threads in it. Lol
     
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  3. AuroraGirl

    AuroraGirl Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Youre correct, I think he was meaning to JB it up to make it work haha. ANd I was thinking thread-sert but the cap is an obstacle. I might go route of attempt to solder then go from there.
     
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  4. MrMarty51

    MrMarty51 Full Access Member

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    If You do not have the nipple that came out of the neck, go to a recycler, most of those was all the same diameter, take along a torch and remove one from a old radiator, I am sure a recycler would let You have that for free.
    Take that home and warm it up, wire bruch the crap off of it, then, use the torch and some solder and "Tin" the outside where it will fit into the radiator.
    Next, take a wet rag and lay it around the neck of the radiator, this will help to dissipate unwanted heat and loosening the neck joint, wire brush and sand the neck surface real clean, apply some solder flux paste with a little heat and tin the area around the hole, insert the nipple and heat it enough to get the solder to flow, let cool and finished.
    Real easy once You get everything properly tinned.
     
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  5. Octane

    Octane Full Access Member

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    Take it to radiator shop.If they say replace it then buy a new one somewhere for cheap.
     
  6. AuroraGirl

    AuroraGirl Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    In the first pic I showed, the rubber hose with the metal on the end(looks like a vent valve) is the nipple It came off perfectly so it must have been a repair or just so evenely done, but on the weaker side? Nice round circle, fits in nice. BUt of course not connected haha
     
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  7. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    Braze it back in. Not a lot of ways to mind fork this one. Or leave it off, And you may have to top off what pukes out about once every couple years unless you actually drive it some miles.
     
  8. AuroraGirl

    AuroraGirl Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    I think you missed the part where I said I would fix it..i even went and found plumping wire brushes, cleaned it up, and found a whole bumch of tinning and flux from like the 60s. If I had lost the barb, I found a threaded piece that fit it just right(with no meat to go behind it, but still) and if it came down to it, I would solder that in.

    But I have the barb!

    You may not think this, grit dog, but I dont actually want to half-ass crap, especially if i can do it
     
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  9. MrMarty51

    MrMarty51 Full Access Member

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    You got way over 1/2 the battle won already. LOL
     
  10. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    I know that, saw it in your first pic. Then several posts about "alternate fixes."
    I was merely stating that there's not a good solution save for brazing (or maybe soldering, can try that, but solder is not designed to hold like you're wanting to do with it). not enough surface area to take the solder. It's not meant to "build up" like a weld, where brazing is. Think soldered pipe fittings. lots of surface area in the connection.
     
  11. AuroraGirl

    AuroraGirl Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    OH My bad, I didnt understand there was a difference. I will look into this, thanks. Is it same process but different solder?
     
  12. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    Same principle/process, but higher temperature and better bond.
    Looking back at your original pic, it looks soldered originally?
    ICBW and soldering it my work just fine if there's enough surface area for the solder to take.
    Both work on capillary action principle, and my above post was a bit misleading, however brazing produces a stronger connection.

    Like mentioned above, there's no liquid or air pressure on the connection and it shouldn't see any real force applied to it.
     
  13. idahovette

    idahovette Full Access Member

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    Yeah Todd, I was getting ready to call BS, cause all of them I've seen were soldered.
     
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