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How to... lift Suburban 4x4

Discussion in 'Off-Roading' started by Marleen Hansen, Mar 24, 2019.

  1. roundhouse

    roundhouse Full Access Member

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    Joined:
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    Location:
    atlanta ga
    First Name:
    justin
    Truck Year:
    77,78,79,80 ?
    Truck Model:
    K10
    Engine Size:
    350
    True but it’s a real pain to get the rivets out
    We did it and used stock height Alcan springs

    That’s the best ridding way to do a lift in the back
    But also the most work
     
  2. Christian Nelson

    Christian Nelson Full Access Member

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    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2011
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    First Name:
    Christian
    Truck Year:
    77
    Truck Model:
    K15
    Engine Size:
    400
    Your cheapest way to get enough lift without replacing driveshafts, and stuff for 38" tires would be a combination of a 4" suspension lift, and a 3" body lift. I've seen a heavy half ton get away with 38/16/15 tires on only a 3" body lift. But, he didn't care if there was some fender rub on the old rusty truck.

    A 4" suspension + 3" body lift should be adequate lift though, and not need driveshafts, crossover steering, etc.

    The truck I currently have had 40's on it, with 4" suspension+3"body lift.

    I am going to probably take the body lift out because I don't anticipate ever going above 35"
     
  3. PrairieDrifter

    PrairieDrifter Full Access Member

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    Location:
    North Dakota
    First Name:
    Mason
    Truck Year:
    84,79,70
    Truck Model:
    Suburban k10, bonanza k10, c10
    Engine Size:
    350, 350, 350
    I mean for the better results and more safety, the extra work is worth it. A torch, an air hammer, and a grinder can make it go pretty fast, none of those things are “that” expensive. Tools like those will also end up paying for themselves in no time.

    Suburbans and blazers are more work since you have to drop the fuel tank, but after 30 years of being on the road it’s a good idea to replace the rubber lines and fuel filler neck in the first place, and the fuel tank straps usually need some work and the sending unit even.

    I’m going to do all the above in one shot when I get the money for it. Do the whole rear suspension and since the fuel tank is out replace what needs to be and that’s a good chunk of items to be checked off the list. Easily a weekend project if you have everything you need ready to go.
     
  4. 77 K20

    77 K20 Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Location:
    Montana
    First Name:
    Mike
    Truck Year:
    1977
    Truck Model:
    K20 5" lift
    Engine Size:
    HT383 fuel injected
    When I did my shackle flip I just used a punch to mark the center of the rivet then had a good set of drill bits. I drilled out the center a bit then used a big hammer and a chisel to knock the head off. Then the punch to push the rivet thru.
    Wasn't "fun" but wasn't as bad as I thought it would be.
    I tried to just use the chisel to knock the whole head right off and that wasn't a possibility. (for me)
     

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