Detroit Locker question......

Discussion in 'Off-Roading' started by Bob Igram, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. Bob Igram

    Bob Igram Junior Member

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    Truck Year:
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    Truck Model:
    K20
    Engine Size:
    350
    Knowing that Corp 14 bolt Detroit Lockers are quite inexpensive, what are the general thoughts on using one on a fairly regularly driven vehicle.........I generally drive kinda gently, im fully middle aged, and ive driven a lot of 60's-80's 4wd, manual trans vehicles in both winter and summer conditions, including a IH Scout II w/ Detroit, so im reasonably familiar with what these differentials can do.......So, knowing that i have a stock 350/Sm465/205 case 83 K20, with 4.10s, 33" tires that will be used for 5-6K miles a year, would you consider a detroit locker any sort of liability whatsoever, thanks Bob
     
  2. shiftpro

    shiftpro Full Access Member

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    Hi Bob, You have a good question here...
    IMO it depends all on driver skill. A very good driver would have no problems and in fact, lots of fun in slippery conditions with a rear locker. Another point I consider is the power output of the vehicle. A truck for example that has the jam to break loose the rear wheels on snow or icy roads AT SPEED is a lot easier to control... drift is the word or some guys call it power sliding. A gutless rig that breaks loose the rear wheels from speed and momentum is balls harder to control than purposely gunning it and drifting.

    By a 'skilled driver' I'm not talking about just someone with no accidents on their record, albeit that is one benefit of skilled driving and also luck. I mean someone who can slide and correct at will, excellent off road technique and just plain old race car driver mind set. So if you're one of these Bob, pin that truck with the rear locker and love life. But if your a driver who needs anti-lock brakes to survive, I would say you best stick with open diffs and by all means... SKINNY TIRES.

    There is also the added liability of wearing down your tires (rear and front) a little sooner if driving aggressively on pavement.
     
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  3. Bob Igram

    Bob Igram Junior Member

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    Engine Size:
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    Here in Southern Oregon, i really dont face BC, Canada conditions..........during an average winter, we see maybe 12" of total snowfall all winter, some years less or even none. For the most part, ive got little interest on breaking tires loose, quite the contrary, my preference is to retain traction,but i appreciate the input
     
  4. 77 K20

    77 K20 Full Access Member

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    I've had a detroit locker in the back of my truck for quite a while. It was my daily driver for a lot of years. They came stock in a lot of Ford trucks back in the day. I've just learned to take it a bit easy pulling out into traffic or when making tight turns. Then once I straighten out then give it more gas.
    I even pull a trailer with mine. Yes, tires do wear a bit more on the rear, but I don't put a whole lot of miles on it anyway.
     
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  5. Blue Ox

    Blue Ox Turning Diesel Fuel Into Fun

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    IMHO, unless you drive off road or it's a performance application I wouldn't do it. Tire wear, noise and sqirreliness in low traction situations make me never want to own another one.
     
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  6. bucket

    bucket Super Moderator Staff Member

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    The answer seems obvious to me. If you liked how your Scout II drove, then get a Detroit. If you didn't, then don't. The trucks are similar in design so it shouldn't be like comparing apples to oranges.
     
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