Toyoder CV Axle

RecklessWOT

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Iirc, an '06 Avalon has a wheel bearing that presses into the knuckle and then onto the wheel hub. A shop press is usually needed. When there's any axle/CV problem, the entire CV shaft gets replaced. That has been common practice for decades now because they have come down so much in cost. Nobody really replaces individual CV parts anymore, even if it's just the boots.
While it is possible to change just the bearing itself, you generally just change the whole hub assembly that comes with a new bearing and be done with it. Most parts stores won't even stock the individual bearing, you end up having to go to a bearing shop, then you need to find someone with a shop press, etc. Changing the whole hub is great because it's 4 bolts (maybe 5, seen it once or twice, almost always 4) then you get a new bearing, axle splines, and wheel studs to boot, and it isn't incredibly expensive. Could you save a couple Jacksons doing just the bearing? Yeah I suppose if you were set up to do it quickly and efficently it's not a huge deal, but I know if I were sitting in the driveway with a bad wheel bearing and wanted my car back on the road I'd drive down to the parts store and buy whatever hub they had in stock, and toss it in. Over and done in an hour including putting away tools.

And yeah I've never bothered repairing an axle. I wait till they fail (or get very close) then just change the whole thing. You're right it is much cheaper nowadays than in the past.
 

RecklessWOT

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Its a well built car, but the engine option is the weaker of the two. When I say not super reliable, people who arent on their oil changes ruin the bottom end on one cylinder at 200k but if you keep up with it like youre supposed to, its 200k+ easily. Im speaking relative because I drive two vehicles with bulletproof engines that take abuse and spit it at you. Im saying i cant verify the owners did their due dilligence before me on a replacement engine hence why the low mileage part.

Its a great car otherwise.
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Lol funny story, over the years of personally owning well over 30 cars and trucks, I can say without a doubt that the single worst engineered vehicle (of its time anyway) was the 2001 Elantra I had. I hated that ******* thing so much. Build quality was surprisingly decent I'll give you that, but it was just made dumb IMO. 2nd worst I would say was the Kia Soul that my wife bought new in 2011, I literally rejoiced when someone ran me off the road and sent that pile to the junkyard and I could take the insurance money and buy a proper Japanese car for her. I will never keep another Korean car in my driveway as long as I live.
 

AuroraGirl

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Lol funny story, over the years of personally owning well over 30 cars and trucks, I can say without a doubt that the single worst engineered vehicle (of its time anyway) was the 2001 Elantra I had. I hated that ******* thing so much. Build quality was surprisingly decent I'll give you that, but it was just made dumb IMO. 2nd worst I would say was the Kia Soul that my wife bought new in 2011, I literally rejoiced when someone ran me off the road and sent that pile to the junkyard and I could take the insurance money and buy a proper Japanese car for her. I will never keep another Korean car in my driveway as long as I live.
The pre 2005 cars from what I gather were dog piles for sure, and the 2009+ cars had the .. yikes... engines that were so bad they still get replaced for free today by hyundai/kia. The successor of the engine I was talking about. the one in my 2006 is only marginally more reliable to the point it didnt get so bad.. so I kinda wish it had been free engine year, but You take some you lose some I got the car cheap lol. I almost got a 2007 toyota(forgot which one) but it was a hybrid and the bid ended up too much for somethingthat probably needed a battery soon to even be effective or useful as a hybrid.
 

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OK....final verdict: bad wheel bearing. Fella who owns the car didn't want a new hub and all, so took the hub to a local parts store where they sold him a new bearing AND installed it in the hub for $27. Took all of a half hour to put it back together.

When they pulled the old bearing out, it came out in pieces.

Thanks for the input fellas.
 

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While it is possible to change just the bearing itself, you generally just change the whole hub assembly that comes with a new bearing and be done with it. Most parts stores won't even stock the individual bearing, you end up having to go to a bearing shop, then you need to find someone with a shop press, etc. Changing the whole hub is great because it's 4 bolts (maybe 5, seen it once or twice, almost always 4) then you get a new bearing, axle splines, and wheel studs to boot, and it isn't incredibly expensive. Could you save a couple Jacksons doing just the bearing? Yeah I suppose if you were set up to do it quickly and efficently it's not a huge deal, but I know if I were sitting in the driveway with a bad wheel bearing and wanted my car back on the road I'd drive down to the parts store and buy whatever hub they had in stock, and toss it in. Over and done in an hour including putting away tools.

And yeah I've never bothered repairing an axle. I wait till they fail (or get very close) then just change the whole thing. You're right it is much cheaper nowadays than in the past.

Many furrin cars, you can get a new bearing and you can get a new hub (just the single part that the wheel bolts to) but you can't get a complete unit bearing assembly because they don't just bolt in. Iirc, an Avalon is one of those cars, along with many other Toyota and Hondas and others. Americans got it right with the bolt-in stuff.
 

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Many furrin cars, you can get a new bearing and you can get a new hub (just the single part that the wheel bolts to) but you can't get a complete unit bearing assembly because they don't just bolt in. Iirc, an Avalon is one of those cars, along with many other Toyota and Hondas and others. Americans got it right with the bolt-in stuff.
I've owned mainly nothing but Japanese sh!t for most of my driving career (as well as many of my friends and I have become personal mechanic to a lot of them), and with the exception of stuff from the late 70s-very early 80s it's all been bolt on hubs right up through fairly late model stuff. Goes pretty much across the board, even the American and Euro trash I've worked on from mid '00s was all just bolt on hubs, I can almost guarantee this Avalon is the same I would honestly be shocked if it were not the case, TBH. Now, the car is not right in front of me so I could be wrong, but as I said before most japanese cars are the same beast and I have worked on everything in that year range from Subarus and Mitsubishis to Nissans and Hondas to several other Toyotas, I have yet to see a "modern" J ap car that uses press in bearings. My Datsun is the last one I can recall being that way, maybe the rear bearings on a rear-drum early/mid 80s corolla, etc.
 

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OK....final verdict: bad wheel bearing. Fella who owns the car didn't want a new hub and all, so took the hub to a local parts store where they sold him a new bearing AND installed it in the hub for $27. Took all of a half hour to put it back together.

When they pulled the old bearing out, it came out in pieces.

Thanks for the input fellas.
Glad that worked out! Man it don't get much cheaper than that. And to find a store that will still touch your car parts for you, must not have been a big retail company. The places that will press bearings and resurface flywheels are going by the wayside, at least around the northeast.
 

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The blister pack stores had 2 options.....the bearing kit for $54 and the complete hub assembly for $85. The fella who owns the car has lived in this little cross road town his whole life and said the local auto parts store was in the same family that his dad used to frequent 50+ yrs ago. Said the fella had the bearing in stock, but would install it for a fee. He said when they handed him the hub back, he asked how much and the fella said "Merry Christmas." lol

Nice to know those things still happen once in awhile.
 

AuroraGirl

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I've owned mainly nothing but Japanese sh!t for most of my driving career (as well as many of my friends and I have become personal mechanic to a lot of them), and with the exception of stuff from the late 70s-very early 80s it's all been bolt on hubs right up through fairly late model stuff. Goes pretty much across the board, even the American and Euro trash I've worked on from mid '00s was all just bolt on hubs, I can almost guarantee this Avalon is the same I would honestly be shocked if it were not the case, TBH. Now, the car is not right in front of me so I could be wrong, but as I said before most japanese cars are the same beast and I have worked on everything in that year range from Subarus and Mitsubishis to Nissans and Hondas to several other Toyotas, I have yet to see a "modern" J ap car that uses press in bearings. My Datsun is the last one I can recall being that way, maybe the rear bearings on a rear-drum early/mid 80s corolla, etc.
I know a lot of fords are really getting into the press in bearings and hubs in late models. Ive heard of others doing it, its all about cheap on the assembly side because its a brand new knuckle with a new bearing and a machine thats automatically pressing it in and a person or a machien that handles slapping it together, wehn the galling, corrosion, rust, fretting, etc

The blister pack stores had 2 options.....the bearing kit for $54 and the complete hub assembly for $85. The fella who owns the car has lived in this little cross road town his whole life and said the local auto parts store was in the same family that his dad used to frequent 50+ yrs ago. Said the fella had the bearing in stock, but would install it for a fee. He said when they handed him the hub back, he asked how much and the fella said "Merry Christmas." lol

Nice to know those things still happen once in awhile.
yes it is :D
 

AuroraGirl

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Glad that worked out! Man it don't get much cheaper than that. And to find a store that will still touch your car parts for you, must not have been a big retail company. The places that will press bearings and resurface flywheels are going by the wayside, at least around the northeast.
I let autozone touch an alternator and an ignition module (EDIS from a ford) and based on how long it took them to hook up to their machines and figure out how to test them, I just assumed nothing definite from the results and instead bought a new module to test online so I could return and the alternator swapped for another one I Had and it worked with a different one so I assumed that was bad(CS130)
 

bucket

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I've owned mainly nothing but Japanese sh!t for most of my driving career (as well as many of my friends and I have become personal mechanic to a lot of them), and with the exception of stuff from the late 70s-very early 80s it's all been bolt on hubs right up through fairly late model stuff. Goes pretty much across the board, even the American and Euro trash I've worked on from mid '00s was all just bolt on hubs, I can almost guarantee this Avalon is the same I would honestly be shocked if it were not the case, TBH. Now, the car is not right in front of me so I could be wrong, but as I said before most japanese cars are the same beast and I have worked on everything in that year range from Subarus and Mitsubishis to Nissans and Hondas to several other Toyotas, I have yet to see a "modern" J ap car that uses press in bearings. My Datsun is the last one I can recall being that way, maybe the rear bearings on a rear-drum early/mid 80s corolla, etc.

I'm not going to argue about it, because frankly, the subject isn't that interesting to me and I really don't care. I'll just say that my previous statement stands and I'll leave it at that.
 

Rusty Nail

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Lmao

Them bigger avalons are different critters but yeah, still a yawnfest.
 

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