To Cut Or Not To Cut

R Carnella

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the internet doesn't like this.
 

custodian

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Anyone have the pinout wire diagram for the plug that goes into the back of the gauge cluster for a 73 C10?
 

AuroraGirl

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i am fairly certain hes blocked me but if he didnt then here you go
 

custodian

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To all those out there that might be looking for the cluster pin out, here's what I was looking for.
 

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dsteelejr

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Anyone have the pinout wire diagram for the plug that goes into the back of the gauge cluster for a 73 C10?
Wiring diagrams work. I’d trust a factory diagram before I’d trust something someone else made up.
 

75gmck25

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Using any cluster newer than about late ‘95 is hard/impossible because that is when GM started using OBD-II, which put the computer in the center of most instrumentation.

In many cases there is no longer a direct connection between a sending unit and gauge, so measuring sending unit resistance or voltage would not work for troubleshooting a gauge. The sending unit provides input to the computer, which processes it and sends the output to the gauge. You cannot get a gauge reading unless the computer is connected.
 

AuroraGirl

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400(?), 350
Using any cluster newer than about late ‘95 is hard/impossible because that is when GM started using OBD-II, which put the computer in the center of most instrumentation.

In many cases there is no longer a direct connection between a sending unit and gauge, so measuring sending unit resistance or voltage would not work for troubleshooting a gauge. The sending unit provides input to the computer, which processes it and sends the output to the gauge. You cannot get a gauge reading unless the computer is connected.
its even nicer when the cluster IS a complex computer(has its own EEPROM and processing unit) in which some of the inputs are direct to the cluster while most engine ones are to the PCM but some are also to the BCM etc.. shared on a data bus which its apart of. I think on my park avenue, there are two direct inputs, the SECURITY telltale(but only half of it..) and the fuel gauge. The rest are provided by other modules etc. Some are logic based, if it doesnt see a certain signal or type of signal in a certain amount of time,it will illuminate a warning or a light depending on certain criteria etc so its complex for sure. GM Trucks to 2002 I think were old school but not to say it doesnt still need extra work. People who run an associated PCM for a swap wouldnt have as much trouble but certainly a custom job would be difficult indeed

In my car the IPC, BCM, and PCM are about equal in the electronic management of the car since it performs the diagnostic ability for like 3 other systems and of course tells you whats going on with the car etc. But thank god the park avenue isnt most cars until the earlier 2000s but there definitely is that phase change starting about then for sure
 

SquareRoot

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its even nicer when the cluster IS a complex computer(has its own EEPROM and processing unit) in which some of the inputs are direct to the cluster while most engine ones are to the PCM but some are also to the BCM etc.. shared on a data bus which its apart of. I think on my park avenue, there are two direct inputs, the SECURITY telltale(but only half of it..) and the fuel gauge. The rest are provided by other modules etc. Some are logic based, if it doesnt see a certain signal or type of signal in a certain amount of time,it will illuminate a warning or a light depending on certain criteria etc so its complex for sure. GM Trucks to 2002 I think were old school but not to say it doesnt still need extra work. People who run an associated PCM for a swap wouldnt have as much trouble but certainly a custom job would be difficult indeed

In my car the IPC, BCM, and PCM are about equal in the electronic management of the car since it performs the diagnostic ability for like 3 other systems and of course tells you whats going on with the car etc. But thank god the park avenue isnt most cars until the earlier 2000s but there definitely is that phase change starting about then for sure
:33::upyours:
 

custodian

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Catawba
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William
Truck Year
1973, 1985
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
5.3 LS, 350
I've decide to remove only the wires that I need from the connector, turn signals, fuel gauge, temp and high beam.
 

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