Replace A/C entirely

Discussion in 'Tech Discussion' started by WillSquared, Dec 7, 2018.

  1. WillSquared

    WillSquared Full Access Member

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    So I have had nothing but trouble out of my AC system since I bought my truck a few years ago. I’ve been through a couple compressors, and now the heater core is leaking. I’d like to just take all the old out and replace it all with new parts. Could someone who knows more than me list out what all I’d need to do that? Here’s a list of what I think. Let me know if I do or don’t need it all. Thanks

    Compressor
    Accumulator
    ORing set
    Orifice tube
    Core/Cap set
    Suction/Discharge lines
    Heater core
    Condenser
    Blower motor
    Blower motor control module


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  2. yevgenievich

    yevgenievich Full Access Member

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    Jumping over to a sanden style compressor might help with compressor reliability.
     
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  3. Snoots

    Snoots Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Sanden 508
     
  4. WillSquared

    WillSquared Full Access Member

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    Mine is the pancake style compressor. What would have to be changed to go to the Sanden?


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  5. yevgenievich

    yevgenievich Full Access Member

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    Depending if v belt or serpentine. Worst case brackets and hoses. Best case brackets and adapter. And the usual dryer/orifice/flush/seals for opening up the system
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018
  6. 75gmck25

    75gmck25 Full Access Member

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    I've replaced almost all the A/C components in my truck, so I can give you an idea of how it would work.

    - Blower motor and heater core were replaced with OEM components.
    - OEM steel fan with severe duty fan clutch
    - Evaporator is still original OEM, along with low temp probe and cutoff switch that is inserted into it. Evaporator was flushed to remove all old oil.

    - Replaced condenser with largest parallel flow that would fit. After the fact I found out that the large OEM condenser may have been fine, but opinions vary.
    - Replaced A6 compressor with a Sanden compressor and brackets from Vintage Air. Had to figure out the best belt length, but otherwise a straightforword job with my V-belt system.
    - Replaced filter/drier with one from about an '85 truck, mostly because the top fittings lined up better. OEM could have been made to work, but the hose fitting was on the bottom.
    - Added a high pressure cutoff switch, screwed into old R12 port fiting. Probably not needed, but recommended. You can just wire it inline with the original low pressure cutoff.
    - Switched to Ford blue orifice. Supposed to work better than GM white with R134a.

    - Had custom barrier hoses made up to connect from compressor to condenser and compressor to evaporator. They put the new R134a charge ports in the fittings where they connect to the compressor. Very easy to reach when charging.
    - The lower evaporator fitting on a '75 is large diameter and it is where the orifice tube fits. They had to make a custom fitting (brazed two together) for that connection because its a small diameter hose but a large fitting. I think the orifice is in a different location on newer trucks.
    - Reassembled with all new green O-rings, lightly lubed with PAG oil
    - Recharged with about 7-8 oz of PAG oil and an R134a charge that is about 75% of the R12 charge. Used the gauges to tune the charge a little further, based on pressures.

    This setup worked well for a couple of years, and then I had problems chasing down a leak. Leak turned out to be the body of the high pressure switch leaking - not what I expected, but I guess its a cheap switch. Currently running again and able to drop the temps down very quickly.

    Bruce
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018
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  7. SquareRoot

    SquareRoot Full Access Member

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    Do you plan on keeping this truck? If the answer is yes, then shitcan the OE system, bite the bullet and buy the Vintage Air Surefit system. I just did this on my 85. You will lose 20 miles of useless vacumn hoses/diaphrams, wires, relays, and stiff cables. It's plug and play, modern technology, reliable and effective. This comes at a price ($1200 ish). Buy once- cry once. I live in Yuma, Az. Summer days are 110+. I get 45 degrees out of the vents. Worth every penny.
     
  8. yevgenievich

    yevgenievich Full Access Member

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    Some temperatures can be archieved with a stock system using sanden compressor as well. All depends on current condition and budget.

     
  9. roundhouse

    roundhouse Full Access Member

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    I used the vintage air also
    And it’s an easy install

    Kinda pricy but also thenother OEM parts add up
    And the vintage air is all new parts
     
  10. WillSquared

    WillSquared Full Access Member

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    Thanks for the info guys. I am torn. I’ve considered the Vintage Air but I could replace the stock setup 3 times over for the price of the vintage air kit. I’ll just have to weigh my options.


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  11. Battlac40

    Battlac40 Full Access Member

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    Pictures are nice !
    .... ?
     

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