repairing instrument panel

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,757
Reaction score
821
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
Some years ago people tried to steal my truck by bashing the steering column apart (see steering column rebuild Raider L). There were pieces of metal all over the floor. In those pieces was a piece of the instrument panel, on the left side, near where the column passes through it. I was so upset I just gathered up all the pieces of my column and threw them out. I realized it to late and the trash had already been picked up, so it was gone. Now I need it. So now I have to make my own. That missing piece allows light to shine out from a light I made (see lamp sockets factory instrument panel), and put in to illuminate the gear indicator. I need to make the missing piece so that when I put in the lower column trim piece that covers up the lower part of the column where the dash mount for the column is. All Squares have this piece of black plastic trim. But the piece that's missing is from the round opening where the column passes under the dash. I am going to make this piece and glue it to that part of the lower instrument panel so any light coming from that lamp socket part I made will not shine out onto the floor or shine out from behind the panel.
 
Last edited:

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,757
Reaction score
821
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
Pics.
You must be registered for see images attach
Here's the pic of the piece that's broken out.
You must be registered for see images attach
Here's the other side and what i am trying to point to is the "hook" that latches to the lower trim piece.
You must be registered for see images attach
This is a piece of scrap plastic off of a roll-a-round. The texture on it kinda looks similar, except the panel has like a enlarged leather look to the surface of it. Hey, this is the best I could find.
You must be registered for see images attach
Here's a better pic of that hook. It won't be that hard to duplicate. It just needs to be in the right place, not to far forward, not to far back or it won't hold the lower trim piece in place right and close up the separation between the panel and the trim piece. Although it doesn't need this hook because there are four screws to attach that trim piece in place. Two screws go into the panel, one on each side, and two go to the lower cover plate under the column. That cover plate attaches to the metal dash. One screw on one side and one on the other. See those big bolt heads? That's what the black plastic trim piece covers.
 
Last edited:

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,757
Reaction score
821
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
cutting the piece out.
You must be registered for see images attach
I'm using my Dremel tool's saw blade. I had to be very careful because this thing is doing 25,000 rpm and will get you, if you don't keep it under control, before you can blink. This pic is just a set up photo and the saw isn't moving at all. It's just stuck in the cut for looks. But you get the idea. I'm cutting it from the back of the piece because there's a step on the other side, see photo above 2 pics back, and I want to make sure I'm getting all of the piece I need.
You must be registered for see images attach
Here's what I'll be making the piece out of. I've got a couple of sets of lines drawn on it but I made a correction in the size so I would have more to work with and can cut down to the actual size. I still have to bend it, long wise, the shape of the part of the panel it will be used in and I'll do that with heat. It'll be okay.
You must be registered for see images attach
I trimmed a little more off so I could get a little closer to the shape I want to start out with.
 

shiftpro

Full Access Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Posts
4,679
Reaction score
5,614
Location
BC Canada
First Name
shiftpro
Truck Year
73-87
Truck Model
1500, 2500, 3500
Engine Size
350, 383, 454, 496!
Feeling creative lately, with time on your hands?

I admire your fab skills and courage, and will certainly follow to see your results
My point is... coming from my geographic perspective, parts like this are literally everywhere. You could probably even LMC it.
But hey custom is cool, so let's roll. Thanks for your contributions (kinda wordy:waytogo: at times... just a bit)...!

If you cut yourself on that saw don't forget pics.
 

mtbadbob

Full Access Member
Joined
May 9, 2021
Posts
150
Reaction score
133
Location
Montana
First Name
Bob
Truck Year
1987
Truck Model
V20
Engine Size
350
A good pair of tin snips will work like scissors on most of that plastic.
 

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,757
Reaction score
821
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
@shiftpro,

Oh heck yeah! If there was blood you know good and well showing it would have a education element to it! These kinds of things always lack the element of drama!

The one that sent me to hospital that time was the real big blade. And that thing would get out of control much easier if you tilted it just a hair it would jump out of the cut. Another thing that would cause it to come after you was allowing it to cut to deep, even on thin stuff. If you allowed the blade to get below center line that's when it would catch and jump out of the cut!
 
Last edited:

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,757
Reaction score
821
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
pics.
You must be registered for see images attach
Here's the set.
You must be registered for see images attach
They've got the speed printed on them.
You must be registered for see images attach
How would you like seeing this one skipping across you hand? Look at the teeth on this sucker! Just imagine that spinning a 25K, and you know that one false move and you're toast! Buzz, buzz right to the bone!!
 

shiftpro

Full Access Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Posts
4,679
Reaction score
5,614
Location
BC Canada
First Name
shiftpro
Truck Year
73-87
Truck Model
1500, 2500, 3500
Engine Size
350, 383, 454, 496!
pics.
You must be registered for see images attach
Here's the set.
You must be registered for see images attach
They've got the speed printed on them.
You must be registered for see images attach
How would you like seeing this one skipping across you hand? Look at the teeth on this sucker! Just imagine that spinning a 25K, and you know that one false move and you're toast! Buzz, buzz right to the bone!!
NOT my hand... yours! No serious I hope you don't loose and parts. A big gash, well that will heal (and leave a mark!)
I have several zip disc injuries. One that left a big dark spot on my finger because of the dirt that got in there deep.

Did you try running the blade backwards in that plastic your cutting? You're still actually melting your way through rather than cutting. If the blade was backwards it may cut just as well but be considerably safer. Like cutting flashing with a non carbide skill saw or table saw, blade on backwards. Hearing protectional the way.
 

Raider L

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Posts
1,757
Reaction score
821
Location
Shreveport, LA
First Name
William
Truck Year
1974
Truck Model
C10
Engine Size
355
@shiftpro,

No I hadn't even thought of trying that. I just make sure I have a good grip on the handle of the Dremel tool and get it over with as quick as I can. I don't want to make my hand tired. Also, I found that anytime that other accidents can happen is when I take my eyes off the blade while I'm reaching over to shut the motor off. You sure don't want to be waving the thing around. You have to establish a procedure in shut off where you place the blade in a position every time, like just raising it up over the piece and hold it there. I always wait until the motor stops completely before I put the blade down. I've found that the tighter I can grip it and keep a very close watch on the blade angle, because as you know it can't be tilted over. It must be kept at 90 degrees to the cut line. As long as you do that and make sure you cut just deep enough to just cut through the thickness of the piece it goes real fast and smooth. And try not to go back to finish cutting through the piece, concentrate on cutting through the first time. Then you're okay.

I used to cut all kinds of different shapes on different thicknesses of plexiglass when I did computer mods where I was putting windows in computer side panels where there was no window before. Many times I'd cut through the metal panels to cut open shapes different shapes for windows. They weren't always a square window either. I did a modifed spider looking thing one time that was real hard to do. I used all different cutting and sanding tools for that one. And most of these were full sized ATX computer cases to.
 
Last edited:

Forum statistics

Threads
35,534
Posts
747,421
Members
24,453
Latest member
jbengfort
Top