Fixing a jimmy rigged electrical system

jfrancom101

Full Access Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2022
Posts
94
Reaction score
17
Location
Idaho
First Name
Jeff
Truck Year
1985
Truck Model
2500 sierra
Engine Size
6.2
I think I finally got the issue worked out! I ran a cable from the driver side battery to the motor to have a better ground and I got it started now! I still will want to redo some wring in the spring, but at this point I do some small things like install the mechanical pump, the oil pressure gauge is leaking oil unto the floor mat, and a couple things like that but hearing her start up like that, was pretty nice after weeks of trying to figure it out. Thanks so much for everyone's help!
 

gotyourgoat

Full Access Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2014
Posts
2,117
Reaction score
3,243
Location
NRV Virginia
First Name
gotyourgoat
Truck Year
1984
Truck Model
c10
Engine Size
smokin' 305
I think I finally got the issue worked out! I ran a cable from the driver side battery to the motor to have a better ground and I got it started now! I still will want to redo some wring in the spring, but at this point I do some small things like install the mechanical pump, the oil pressure gauge is leaking oil unto the floor mat, and a couple things like that but hearing her start up like that, was pretty nice after weeks of trying to figure it out. Thanks so much for everyone's help!
Yay!! Take in the victory.:cheers:

Before you forget where they go, label as many of those wires as you can. It will look stupid but may just save a bunch of time down the road.
 

rick1956

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2022
Posts
14
Reaction score
14
Location
Edgewood, WA
First Name
Rick
Truck Year
1984
Truck Model
C2500
Engine Size
350
Take your time and do a good job on those crimp connects... I was out working on my 'new' 84 yesterday (just bought a couple weeks ago), and EVERY crimp connection under the hood that I tugged on except one of them pulled apart by hand with not much force. They were all the yellow connector size for large wiring, so it's possible the guy didn't have pliers that were up to the job. I'm just one of those people strip the outer covering off of most of my crimp connections, then lightly crimp them to hold together, then solder them.
I just refuse to fall victim to wiring woes on a dark, empty highway... solder, solder, solder.
 

WP29P4A

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2021
Posts
398
Reaction score
557
Location
Reno Nevada
First Name
Mike
Truck Year
1987
Truck Model
Sierra Classic V1500
Engine Size
350 TBI
Crimp on connectors are only as good as the person installing them and the tools they use. If the connectors are not the correct size for the wire they won't stay on. If you use a cheap crimper/pliers that just squeezes them, they don't stay on. To use them correctly, you need proper sizes and a crimper with the pin on one side of the crimp surface to properly and firmly attach them to the wire. Soldering is only helpful if you know how to solder correctly and use the correct solder with flux.

If you have the crimpers with two rounded crimping surfaces instead of the pin on one side, THROW them away and buy real crimpers. I like other people thought crimp connectors were a poor connection until I learned how to properly install them. When done correctly with the right tool, you can't pull them off without damaging the wire.

The connectors with the colored plastic sleeve on them are much harder to crimp properly compared to the ones without plastic sleeve. I prefer the bare metal connectors with shrink wrap.
 

Attachments

  • 20220113_124710.jpg
    20220113_124710.jpg
    109.3 KB · Views: 10

AuroraGirl

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2019
Posts
7,695
Reaction score
4,339
Location
Northern Wisconsin
First Name
Taylor
Truck Year
1978, 1980
Truck Model
K10, K25
Engine Size
400(?), 350
Crimp on connectors are only as good as the person installing them and the tools they use. If the connectors are not the correct size for the wire they won't stay on. If you use a cheap crimper/pliers that just squeezes them, they don't stay on. To use them correctly, you need proper sizes and a crimper with the pin on one side of the crimp surface to properly and firmly attach them to the wire. Soldering is only helpful if you know how to solder correctly and use the correct solder with flux.

If you have the crimpers with two rounded crimping surfaces instead of the pin on one side, THROW them away and buy real crimpers. I like other people thought crimp connectors were a poor connection until I learned how to properly install them. When done correctly with the right tool, you can't pull them off without damaging the wire.

The connectors with the colored plastic sleeve on them are much harder to crimp properly compared to the ones without plastic sleeve. I prefer the bare metal connectors with shrink wrap.
I think those sleeves "are" shrink wrap but the dumb part is that since they dont span over the ends at all enough to take tension off the connection/disincentivize kinks etc its kinda pissing in the wind. keeps it from shorting on stuff, but that is just catering to improper use lol
 

WP29P4A

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2021
Posts
398
Reaction score
557
Location
Reno Nevada
First Name
Mike
Truck Year
1987
Truck Model
Sierra Classic V1500
Engine Size
350 TBI
I think those sleeves "are" shrink wrap but the dumb part is that since they dont span over the ends at all enough to take tension off the connection/disincentivize kinks etc its kinda pissing in the wind. keeps it from shorting on stuff, but that is just catering to improper use lol
The basic ones we get at auto parts stores and Home Depot are just plastic sleeves, you can find the premium ones with the shrink sleeves also at limited stores. I still like being able to adjust the color size and length by using bulk shrink wrap and "naked" connectors. Makes for a cleaner, slimmer and more durable connection in the long run.

I think the colored sleeves are to help the DIY crowd figure out the different wire sizes mostly.
 

AuroraGirl

Full Access Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2019
Posts
7,695
Reaction score
4,339
Location
Northern Wisconsin
First Name
Taylor
Truck Year
1978, 1980
Truck Model
K10, K25
Engine Size
400(?), 350
The basic ones we get at auto parts stores and Home Depot are just plastic sleeves, you can find the premium ones with the shrink sleeves also at limited stores. I still like being able to adjust the color size and length by using bulk shrink wrap and "naked" connectors. Makes for a cleaner, slimmer and more durable connection in the long run.

I think the colored sleeves are to help the DIY crowd figure out the different wire sizes mostly.
make sense. I like the solder shrink tubes and marine heat shrink tubing.
 

SirRobyn0

Full Access Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2019
Posts
2,686
Reaction score
2,767
Location
In the woods in Western Washington
First Name
Rob
Truck Year
1984
Truck Model
C20
Engine Size
350
I'm going to preface this by saying I have not read though all the pages, and I don't even know if I might have commented pages ago, but to those talking about crimp connectors and soldering: I agree, crimp connectors can be just fine crimped by someone that knows what they are doing, I agree soldering is better, but in some situations it's impractical IMO, whether it be for time or location of the crimp. Obviously a poor crimp is destine to fail sooner or later, but more important than a good crimp vs soldered is shrink wrapping. You have no idea how many times I've troubleshooted a electrical issue, to find whatever repair was not sealed from moisture and corrosion occurred, sometimes if I'm lucky it's just cutting off the end of the wire and installing another connector, other times it's replacing the effected wire. Shrink wrap can be shrinked with an open flame, but a heat gun is better and more even. If the repair is some place shrink wrap is impractical then a few coats of liquid electrical tape will work as it will adhere itself to the wiring. Terminals such as a spade terminal should get a dab of dielectric grease put on it before before it is plugged into whatever it's getting plugged into. When a bulb is changed a dab of dielectric grease will keep your sockets lubed, and moisture out.

We wouldn't see near as much electrical work and re-work if more attention was paid to sealing connections and lubricating connections, both at the factory and by those of us working on them.

Bulk connectors and shrink wrap is what we keep in stock at the shop.
 

mtbadbob

Full Access Member
Joined
May 9, 2021
Posts
150
Reaction score
138
Location
Montana
First Name
Bob
Truck Year
1987
Truck Model
V20
Engine Size
350
The basic ones we get at auto parts stores and Home Depot are just plastic sleeves, you can find the premium ones with the shrink sleeves also at limited stores. I still like being able to adjust the color size and length by using bulk shrink wrap and "naked" connectors. Makes for a cleaner, slimmer and more durable connection in the long run.

I think the colored sleeves are to help the DIY crowd figure out the different wire sizes mostly.
I'm with you. I like using the bare high temp connectors with heat shrink myself. Definitely makes for a cleaner, smaller connection!
 

Forum statistics

Threads
35,557
Posts
748,106
Members
24,482
Latest member
JohnC
Top