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best way to service power steering pump?

Discussion in 'Tech Discussion' started by Jwernatl, Oct 19, 2020.

  1. Jwernatl

    Jwernatl Member

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    Guys Need to replace the fluid in my power steering pump - is there a best way to do this? (without removal?) The fluid is old burned up smelly and yucky.
     
  2. Swearbody

    Swearbody Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    There are a ton of options. Im assuming no one answered yet because its such a trivial task. Here is a few options
    Use a turkey baster to suck it out
    use a mighty vac
    use some paper towels or shop rags
    use a long funnel to displace the old fluid with new by placing snout of funnel at lowest position in the reservoir.
     
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  3. fast68chevy

    fast68chevy I am the original fast68chevy

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    just disconnect pressure hose at the box and put it in a bucket and dump in new fluid as its running turning wheels flush it it out good. run new hydraulic oil AW32 or AW46. cheap store bought ps fluid is total garbage. i just re-sealed my steering pump the other day. it was leaking out the reservoir seals badly..

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    Last edited: Oct 24, 2020
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  4. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    ^What he said. But I disconnect the return line. Low pressure.
    Run engine for a couple seconds line into a bucket, replace lost fluid. Repeat a few times until “old” fluid comes out clean.
    Helps to have 2 people for this task.

    On newer cars, I do a “lazy mans flush” on PS and brake fluid if it’s still decent fluid. Suck out all the fluid in reservoir with turkey baster or vac pump. Replace, run, repeat several times. Brakes I run the vehicle for weeks between replacements so the fluid “mixes”.
    Not as complete as first method, but think this way. mic you get 50% first time, next time will be 75%, next 87.5, next 93 etc. it wastes good fluid but quicker cleaner easier.
    Not if fluid is trashed though imo.
     
  5. 1987 GMC Jimmy

    1987 GMC Jimmy Automobile Hoarder

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    I like to siphon the reservoir, disconnect the return, jack up the front, and turn the wheels lock to lock continuously while keeping the reservoir filled until it’s spitting out clean fluid. That way the pump’s not spinning with the engine and potentially going dry.
     
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  6. fast68chevy

    fast68chevy I am the original fast68chevy

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    it wont hurt it to be dry for a few seconds. i can atest to it.. i ran mine dry f rdays a t a time otally bone dry and then when i disassembled it the other day to re-seal it it was fine.,. not a peck of any metal anything at al no damage to be concerned about. there is a factory instaleld storng magnet on the backside fo the pump inside to catch anything at all and mine has not a peck or a single shaving anything after running it dry ALOT daily and very recently.
    but of course anyone/everyone has their own opinions or ideas and whatever,, you can do whatever you want with what information you have here now.. if i knew for sure that it would cause bad damage to your pump then i would not recommend or suggest it. aqll youre doing here is trying to repladce your old nasty burnt up contaminated fluid in a 40 year old pump,,. we arent doing rocket science here.,. just drain the damn thing and stick new oil in it.. done.. whichever way you want to.. some ppl seem to want to make a huge ordeal about or over something minor or simple..
     
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  7. Grit dog

    Grit dog Full Access Member

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    Will it spit the fluid all out slowly like this? Never tried it but that’s a great idea.
     
  8. jake wells

    jake wells Full Access Member

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    i used the turkey baster on mine and replaced it with dexron vi and it works just fine.
    got rid of the nasty smelly fluid and the whine on cold mornings.
     
  9. 1987 GMC Jimmy

    1987 GMC Jimmy Automobile Hoarder

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    Nah, it’s very quick. The steering is unloaded so you just work it back and forth till it’s clear.

    I use universal fluid. It’s about as viscous as cooking oil, and some people here say to switch from the thick stuff to that, which I’m in that camp. I like it because it’s not viscous like Dex so I know it always flows well, particularly in the cold, so the pump doesn’t have to push what amounts to molasses. The lubricity isn’t as good as ATF, but I think in this situation the hydraulic aspect is more important than the lubricating one, and it’s best not to punish the pump. If something went awry, I’d be the first to admit I was wrong, but I have it in my Jimmy and my Cutlass and both are fine with it, the former utilizing recirculating ball steering and the latter has rack and pinion.

    Whatever the merits of the different fluids, I’d cite service literature and go by that regardless.
     
  10. 1987 GMC Jimmy

    1987 GMC Jimmy Automobile Hoarder

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    And to go along with what I just said above, I think it makes sense to do this in your situation just like you’d use a higher viscosity oil in a tired engine.
     
  11. jake wells

    jake wells Full Access Member

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    The only reason i used Dexron VI is because it flows much better cold than some power steering fluids and Dex/Merc III.
    Besides winters are unpredictable here either it's to damn cold or not at all.
     
  12. idahovette

    idahovette Full Access Member

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    Please don't get your panties in a wad because someone suggests something different than your method. We all have different ways of making things work.
     
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